dorset chiapas solidarity

January 25, 2015

In Mexico Over 650,000 Kids Forced to Work Instead of to School

Filed under: Human rights — Tags: , , — dorsetchiapassolidarity @ 7:51 pm

 

In Mexico Over 650,000 Kids Forced to Work Instead of to School

 

childrenworking.jpg_1718483346

Mexico has one of the largest child labor forces in Latin America, second only to Colombia. 

At least 21 percent of all Mexican youth between the ages of 7 and 14 – what amounts to 651,000 kids – give up school because they are forced to work, according to a new study released by UNESCO.

The figures mean that Mexico has one of the largest child labor forces in all of Latin America, second only to Colombia where 25 percent of youth are forced to work.

Worldwide, the number is also higher than other countries such as Indonesia (19 percent) and Sri Lanka (10 percent) and comparable to Cambodia (23 percent), Zambia (20 percent) and Nigeria (25 percent).

 

Child labor around the world. (Graphic: UNESCO)

Child labor around the world. (Graphic: UNESCO)

The UNESCO report also highlights the disparities between rich and poor in the country, where children from poor families in rural areas tend to have little chance of entering school at any point in their life, while wealthy urban families have more access to education.

According to state numbers, 3.1 million kids across the country do not attend school, but only 651,000 children substitute classroom learning specifically for work, usually because families are in need of extra income.

 

Growing inequality fueled by western-imposed neoliberalism forces children out of school and into work to help with family income. The sign reads, “We want justice and education.” (Photo: AFP)

Growing inequality fueled by western-imposed neoliberalism forces children out of school and into work to help with family income. The sign reads, “We want justice and education.” (Photo: AFP)

Other causes include entrenched gender roles, where impoverished families are often forced to choose between their son or daughter to send to school (which is generally the male), and regional conflicts or violence in the country that prohibits children from attending school.

According to UNESCO, countries have a duty to ensure education for all, and should do more to make sure that the need to work does not compete with the aspiration to educate themselves.

The report advises countries with a high child labour force to seek a balance “between interventions specifically aimed at [helping] the most marginalized children and broader reforms in the entire education system.”

http://www.telesurtv.net/english/news/Mexico-Over-650000-Kids-Forced-to-Work-Instead-of-School-20150124-0011.html  

 

Over 17,000 Mexican Children Attempt to Enter US Every Year

mexico_border_kids.jpg_1718483346

Growing inequality fueled by western-imposed neoliberalism forces children out of school and into work to help with family income. The sign reads, “We want justice and education.” (Photo: AFP)

 

Most Mexican youth trying to enter the U.S. are deported immediately without being asked about the risks they face at home. | Photo: Reuters

A new study shows that over 60 percent of Mexican youth trying to enter the United Stares are fleeing situations of violence.

Each year, the United States Border Patrol stops 17,000 young Mexicans trying to enter the United States illegally, according to a new study released Friday by the Washington Office of Latin America (WOLA).

The report also states that these youth, most of whom are fleeing situations of violence, including being exploited by gangs, are “rarely listened to” or asked about the risks they faced at home. They are deported almost immediately.

“There are many problems with the evaluation of children: Often interviews are conducted in a public environment that intimidates children, agents do not have adequate training to deal with vulnerable children and often do not know how to ask about abuse and trafficking,” the WOLA study stated.

According to the report, “Mexican Immigrant Children Forgotten at the Border,” Mexican children do not see the same kind of protections afforded to minors from Central America when they are detained at the U.S. border.

Last year, tens of thousands of children tried to enter the U.S. illegally from El Salvador, Guatemala and Honduras, leading to President Barack Obama calling the situation on the border a “humanitarian crisis.”

The United Nations warned Obama that people coming from these countries should be treated as refugees as they are likely fleeing situations of violence, prompting the U.S. to implement certain protections for them. However, these migrant children still face eventual deportation.

A similar report was released by the U.N.’s refugee agency, which says 59 percent of all the unaccompanied Mexican minors detained at the border are fleeing situations of violence. The group also states that less than 5 percent of Mexican children detained at the border actually get the opportunity to present their case in front of a migration judge to determine whether they are eligible for protection in the U.S.

The WOLA report concludes by asking for greater investment and resources into violence prevention programs in Mexico and for better training for border security services on how to deal with and assess child migrants.

http://www.telesurtv.net/english/news/Over-17000-Mexican-Children-Attempt-to-Enter-US-Every-Year-20150123-0019.html

.

**************************************************

.

Advertisements

Leave a Comment »

No comments yet.

RSS feed for comments on this post. TrackBack URI

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

Blog at WordPress.com.

%d bloggers like this: