dorset chiapas solidarity

March 31, 2015

Chiapas mobilization against organized crime

Filed under: Acteal, Indigenous — Tags: , , , — dorsetchiapassolidarity @ 2:26 pm

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 Chiapas mobilization against organized crime

by Chiapas Support Committee

Pilgrimage against organized crime in Chiapas

The banner hung on the entrance to the town says: Civilian Resistance of Simojovel.

The banner hung on the entrance to the town says: Civilian Resistance of Simojovel.

Thousands of people wound their way on foot down and around the mountain roads of the Chiapas Highlands during the first two days of the Pueblo Creyente pilgrimage. On March 23, at least 15 thousand pilgrims (according to a local online media source [1]) left the town of Simojovel, Chiapas, on a pilgrimage to the state capital of Tuxtla Gutiérrez. The parish priest of San Antonio de Padua Parish in Simojovel and members of Pueblo Creyente (Believing People), both lay and religious, along with members of parishes in neighbouring municipalities, went on a Lenten Way of the Cross, a walking pilgrimage to denounce the advance of organized crime in their municipalities, and also to denounce that the threats and attacks from local politicians against the priest, the parish council and members of Pueblo Creyente have increased. Complaints from this region, in the north central part of the state, include: Alcoholism, drug addiction, prostitution, armed robbery, murder, large groups of bad guys, arms trafficking, drug trafficking, cattle rustling, extortion, anonymous threats, kidnappings, corruption of authorities, insecurity and
impunity. As the marchers walked down the winding mountain roads, people in the villages came out and joined the march because they are also experiencing the advance of organized crime.

Pueblo Creyente is a political-religious organization in the Catholic Diocese of San Cristóbal de las Casas, Chiapas, Mexico. Its members have participated in demonstrations and marches, which they call pilgrimages, for years. For the past several months, however, members of Pueblo Creyente in Simojovel have been denouncing the increase of cantinas, drugs, prostitution and organized crime, as well as political corruption. They state that this has led to threats of violence against the parish priest, Marcelo Pérez, and the parish council. The local politicians they name as responsible for the threats, attacks and corruption are Ramiro Gómez Domínguez, a pre-candidate to the municipal presidency, and Juan Gómez Domínguez, a candidate for (local) deputy. Both are members of the Revolutionary Institutional Party (PRI).

On November 4, the politician Ramiro Gómez Domingo filed a complaint with the Attorney General of the Republic (PGR) against Father Marcelo Pérez, accusing the priest of destabilizing the region. Pueblo Creyente sees the charge as a reprisal for an October 8 pilgrimage. More than 12,000 people participated in that pilgrimage to denounce the proliferation of cantinas, the sale of drugs, prostitution and arms trafficking, motivated by the participation of local authorities. During the November 25 hearing on the charges filed against him, Father Marcelo Pérez denounced the advance of organized crime in the municipality and the corruption of the authorities.

The advance of organized crime, “a reflection of what is happening throughout the country”

The entry of organized crime into the northern part of the state is no secret. The cultivation, distribution and sale of drugs in the region is public knowledge, as is arms trafficking. In a February call for the pilgrimage, Pueblo Creyente stated: “Simojovel is a reflection of what is happening throughout the country. Institutionalized corruption is governing the country, therefore all peoples must rise up and organize to defend life; what is in danger is human life, the future of our children.”

On February 3, 2015, Pueblo Creyente issued a call for the pilgrimage with the following words:

“The town of Simojovel has no safe drinking water; the health centre is in pitiful condition, but the cantinas, prostitution centres, drug trafficking, arms trafficking, sex trade, corruption etc. are increasing. The worst thing is that some PRI political leaders are the ones that are promoting these acts that keep the people kidnapped. Therefore, they want to kill or incarcerate the priest and members of the parish council and representatives of Pueblo Creyente in this town of Simojovel.

Therefore, the Pueblo Creyente of Simojovel make a call for a huge Lenten Way of the Cross Pilgrimage from Simojovel to Tuxtla and all the towns that suffer violence: like Acteal, Ayotzinapa, Banavil, Chicomuselo, the towns that suffer high electricity rates, foreign mega-projects, etc.; “the consequence of the corruption, complicity, impunity and ambition of the system of government and of the legal reforms that are generating more poverty.” [2]

Part of the civilian resistance

Pueblo Creyente participates in marches/pilgrimages with other social organizations to protest the megaprojects, high electricity rates, land grabs, displacements and political prisoners. Pueblo Creyente also sends representatives to gatherings of other social organizations and they made the call to those all those social organizations to join them in the pilgrimage. Pueblo Creyente is part of the civilian resistance to the advance of capitalist accumulation, as well as the advance of organized crime.

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Members of Catholic parishes from Simojovel, Bochil, Amatán, Pueblo Nuevo and El Bosque are accompanied on their pilgrimage by social and human rights organizations, including the Fray Bartolomé de las Casas Human Rights Centre (Frayba), which issued a press bulletin asking that the government guarantee the personal safety of the marchers. [3]

Frayba’s press bulletin went on to say that during the four days of the tour other Chiapas parishes, Ecclesiastic Base Communities and churches of other religious denominations were expected to join the pilgrimage, and that did, in fact occur. Members of the Frayba, representatives of civil society organizations, international observation organizations, members of the clergy from the Archdiocese of Tuxtla and from the San Cristóbal Diocese, as well as members of the free media accompanied the marchers.

The mobilization arrived in the state capital of Tuxtla Gutiérrez on Thursday, March 26. The Virgin of Guadalupe parish in Tuxtla received the marchers and they held a religious ceremony there. They read their demands in Tuxtla’s central plaza, in front of the government palace. Their demands reflected the broad spectrum of organizations supporting and accompanying the pilgrimage and their rejection of the advance of capitalist privatizations and megaprojects. One group present was the Popular Movement in Resistance against the dams and mining companies in the north region of Chiapas.

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The indigenous and campesino participants in the pilgrimage summed up their demands in six categories: Stop the impunity and corruption of all the state’s authorities; no to the mega-projects, no to the Palenque-San Cristóbal Superhighway, no to hydro-electric dams, no to mining projects and to the dispossession of lands; no to the structural reforms, abolition of the neoliberal reforms, the property reforms, no to the high cost of electric energy, no to the privatization of water; adequate use of public resources for better services; no to forced displacement, true justice and return for Banavil in Tenejapa and Primero de Agosto in Las Margaritas; and a stop to the violence, drug trafficking, prostitution, murder and kidnapping, as well as the cancellation of arrest warrants and freedom for political prisoners. [4]

This was an important mobilization. Rather than shrinking in fear of the threats made, Pueblo Creyente of Simojovel and their neighbours in the north central part of Chiapas mobilized thousands to stand up and resist the corruption and impunity that accompanies the advance of organized crime.

By: Mary Ann Tenuto Sánchez

Sources:

[1] http://www.pozol.org/?p=10440

[2] http://chiapasdenuncia.blogspot.com/2015/02/pueblo-creyente-de-simojovel.html

[3]http://www.frayba.org.mx/archivo/boletines/150323_boletin_09_peregrina_simojovel

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[4]http://chiapasdenuncia.blogspot.com/2015/03/pronunciamiento-de organizaciones.html

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Indians of Chiapas, among the displaced indigenous groups in Latin America

Filed under: Acteal, Displacement, Indigenous — Tags: , , , — dorsetchiapassolidarity @ 2:03 pm

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Indians of Chiapas, among the displaced indigenous groups in Latin America

UNAM researcher highlights the importance of the human rights of the vulnerable groups of the continent.

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From Mexico to Brazil the greatest number of people forced to move from their territory are individuals from indigenous communities, said Katherine Isabel Herazo González, professor at the Faculty of Psychology (FP), UNAM.

This can be seen in Chiapas, with the Zapatista movement; in Nicaragua, with the miskito; in Colombia, with the Nasa and Embera Katio, or in Peru, with the Ashaninca, each associated with a socio-political process, said the graduate of the Postgraduate Programme in Latin American Studies, Faculty of Arts and Letters (FFyL), UNAM reported.

The difficult situation extends to countries in the region through community, political and economic conflicts. The phenomenon begins to occur as a way to win internal wars, in other words, displacement becomes a political-military strategy.

She said she worked with Tzotzil and Tzeltal populations and that in the first group their language has no words for human rights, marking the first epistemological dilemma, because they conceived of them as something remote, coming from the West.

“From their cosmovision, human rights are not only built by regulations or human regularization, but there are others in existence, customary in nature, based on uses, customs and ways of understanding reality,” she explained.

That notion is strengthened in their political affinity, as in the civil society group Las Abejas, who are defending their land, autonomy and territory, but peacefully. When they are displaced, ethical and religious elements play a fundamental role.

“Their way of cohesion and living together in community allows them to generate support networks, which are very important when they have to move from their place.”

About the title of her thesis, the academic explained that for these people Chiapas the term to be displaced does not exist and those who this happens to are described as those who fled. “The way of naming the world reveals the particularity of conceiving it; for them, those who departed did so due to fear, terror and harassment.”

The Prize

The researcher was in first place in the V Thesis Prize about Latin America and the Caribbean 2013 – convoked by the Centre for Research on Latin America and the Caribbean (CIALC) – Doctoral category.

In her work for her degree: Those who fled (jataveletik). Social representations and human rights of the displaced indigenous, the university researcher argues that these movements change as social forces and hegemonic and counter-hegemonic powers become in tension.

Herazo González rescues the history and the voices of those who were forced to leave their home place and establishes that human rights are a pillar to strive for.

“If someone is displaced they lose not only their land but also their social fabric and history, which cause a breakdown of identities. In addition, for the indigenous their relationship with their territory is sacred,” said the academic in a statement from the highest seat of learning.

The graduate of the Postgraduate Programme in Latin American Studies, Faculty of Arts and Letters indicated that there are also other non-indigenous displaced populations, although research is focused on that nucleus, being historically the most vulnerable.

“At a micro level my idea was to highlight how they experienced individual guarantees in these communities, how vulnerable they are and to study their social representations in the field. This showed why the debate over their rape and violation persists.”

http://otrosmundoschiapas.org/index.php/temas-analisis/41-41-indigenas/1904-indigenas-de-chiapas-entre-los-grupos-originarios-mas-desplazados-de-america-latina

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“We will not allow cases such as Ayotzinapa, Acteal and Pueblo Nuevo to happen because of corruption,” – Pilgrimage for Justice.

Filed under: Frayba — Tags: , , — dorsetchiapassolidarity @ 10:27 am

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“We will not allow cases such as Ayotzinapa, Acteal and Pueblo Nuevo to happen because of corruption,” – Pilgrimage for Justice.

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Tuxtla Gutierrez, Chiapas, March 26th. “We will not allow cases such as Ayotzinapa, Acteal and Pueblo Nuevo to happen because of corruption,” warned participants in the Pilgrimage of the Pueblo Creyente (Believing People) in the capital of Chiapas, concluding their four-day walk through the municipalities of Simojovel, Bochil, Ixtapa, Chiapa de Corzo and Tuxtla Gutiérrez.

“It is necessary to add the sufferings and petitions of those who answered the call to this pilgrimage,” said the pilgrims in the central square of Tuxtla. “The situation in Chiapas is serious. How do they say that Chiapas is a safe state? If we are here in our thousands saying that our lives are in danger, from the narcopoliticians, such as the Gómez Domínguez family from Simojovel, who are supported by the parties of the PRI and the Green Ecologist of Mexico,” they said.

Meanwhile, the Fray Bartolomé de las Casas Human Rights Centre (Frayba), said that they will be aware of the situation of all these human rights defenders, “who are courageously giving their testimony against authority, against society.” “We are greatly concerned that during the whole journey the life of Father Marcelo Perez was at risk,” they stress and state that “we have been taking notes about all these events, we hold the authorities responsible for anything that happens to the people who have given their testimony today.”

Frayba adds that “the state government had only a couple of meetings before the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights, based in Washington, learned of these events, ie two years after having demanded that they solve the problem.” “We had to resort to international bodies in order to register the pressing demands of the population,” they say.

The indigenous and campesino participants in the pilgrimage summarized their petitions in six points:

An end to the impunity and corruption of all state authorities; no to megaprojects, no to the Palenque San Cristobal superhighway, no to hydroelectric projects, no to mining projects and land dispossession; no to structural reforms, abolition of the neoliberal reforma, to the Mexican tax reforms, no to charging high energy costs, no to the privatization of water; proper use of public resources for better services; no forced displacement, justice, truth and a return for Banavil in Tenejapa and Primero de Agosto in Las Margaritas; and an end to violence, drug trafficking, prostitution, murder, kidnapping, as well as cancellation of arrest warrants and the release of political prisoners.

This is day in the capital of Chiapas the teachers’ movement held a megamarch, which left the premises of the Mactumactzá Rural Normal School and ended with a rally in front of the central park of the capital city. Here they remembered the normalistas disappeared by the state last 26th September, and confirmed their rejection of the neoliberal reforms of Peña Nieto. Similarly they announced that they will soon carry out a total strike.

http://www.pozol.org/?p=10449

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March 30, 2015

Chiapas: Families of the Primero de Agosto community “in precarious conditions”

Filed under: Displacement, Frayba, Indigenous — Tags: , , — dorsetchiapassolidarity @ 1:33 pm

Torture in Mexico Is out of Control

Filed under: Human rights — dorsetchiapassolidarity @ 12:24 pm

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Torture in Mexico Is out of Control

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Dianna Ortiz, the American nun tortured in Guatemala, and David Sanchez, a Mexican human rights defender. | Photo: David Sanchez

Dianna Ortiz, the American nun tortured in Guatemala, and David Sanchez, a Mexican human rights defender. | Photo: David Sanchez

In four years, 7,000 cases of torture were reported, but the number could be much greater, said David Sanchez, human rights defender.

The practice of torture by security forces in Mexico is out of control, human rights defender David Sanchez told teleSUR on Sunday, adding that complaints by victims of cruel and unusual punishment by police and military have increased by about 600 percent compared to 2003.

“In 2013 alone, the National Human Rights Commission (CNDH) reported at least 1,505 denunciations by victims of torture, which is 600 percent more than 10 years earlier,” said Sanchez, who worked for the Committee Against Torture and Impunity (CCTI) for many years.

The human rights activist said cases of torture could be much higher than reported, as many victims prefer not to denounce crimes against them out of fear and out of frustration because authorities have a track record of not investigating, much less sentencing cases of human rights crimes.

“The fact is that in all the history of human rights violations in Mexico, only one case has actually ended in a sentencing. All other case of torture go unpunished and this is a deterrent for people to lay charges,” he said.

In the years from 2010 to 2013, the CNDH received 7,000 torture denunciations, Sanchez stated, “none of which have even been investigated. This shows a lack of interest and will by the government to attack this issue, and instead, proves the government is promoting, even if unwillingly, massive impunity in the country.”

Sanchez expressed concern that “those who resort to torture, are shielded by an almost absolute state of impunity. Cynically, the Supreme Court has reported 123 trials in cases of torture between 2005 and 2013, admitting that only seven resulted in sentences against the perpetrators.

However, justice officials have only been able to produce evidence of sentencing in one case, said Sanchez, while suggesting that under President Enrique Peña Nieto, the government has returned to policies of repression.

Recently, Edith Escareño, a CCTI activist, also said there is prove of sentencing in only one case of torture in Mexico.

“We asked the Supreme court to provide documentation of the seven cases it claims resulted in sentencing, however they have only been able to prove one case,” she told teleSUR.

David Sanchez suggested that the international community has expressed apathy toward the human rights situation in Mexico because the United States may be interested in making sure Mexico remains under a situation of chaos and violence.

“Washington thrives on promoting destabilization within the countries it wants to control because of the economic interests it has in the region,” he added.

Sanchez criticized the U.S. government for declaring Venezuela a threat to its national security. “Mexico is a true threat to the United States’ national security.

This is real because we are their direct southern neighbors and we export drugs and violence to their territory, and Mexico also poses a threat regarding the possible smuggling of terrorist into their country. This is a real threat,” he said.

He accused the Mexican government of hypocrisy and of projecting a false image of respect to human rights by implementing new laws that in practice have proven to be useless in protecting the rights of victims.

When asked why international organizations apparently do very little if anything to pressure the Mexican government regarding human rights, Sanchez said, “The United States is responsible for this, because among other things, it has reduced its contributions to the United Nations and the Organization of American States, thus decreasing their budget for human rights issues.” The human rights defender also accused the government of intimidating activists.

“I know of many cases where human rights activist receive death threats that are obviously made by government entities. CCTI’s website was blocked on various occasions. My phone has been tapped by the government various times and my email blocked as well,” he said.

Sanchez directly accused President Enrique Peña Nieto of promoting impunity and repression in order to ensure the population feels intimidated against staging major protests.

Recently, Sinaloan human rights expert Oscar Loza Ochoa told teleSUR that torture was a practices in Mexico that was on the rise, and that cases were being reported on a daily basis in every state of the country. “The situation of torture is out of control and the government is not only not doing anything about it, but it is making sure this cases do not become publicized,” Loza Ochoa added.

On March 19, the Australia-based NGO Institute for Economics and Peace (IEP) released its 2015 Mexico Peace Index Report, revealing that impunity levels have reached “unprecedentedly high levels.”

The report also revealed the number of murders relative to the number of homicide prosecutions in Mexico has doubled to 3.34 in 2013, from 1.45 in 2006. The NGO also said that the sentencing rate for all crimes halved between 2003 and 2014 from 210 sentences per 100,000 crimes to 104 per 100,000.

After considering these figures highly disturbing, IEP pointed out that such levels of impunity underpin the high public perceptions of insecurity and violence.

http://www.telesurtv.net/english/news/Torture-in-Mexico-Is-out-of-Control-20150322-0002.html.

WordPress.com

Attacks Against Mexican Journalists up 80% Under Peña Nieto

Filed under: Journalists — Tags: — dorsetchiapassolidarity @ 12:00 pm

Attacks Against Mexican Journalists up 80% Under Peña Nieto

Journalist Alberto Lopez Bello was recently found dead, along with a policeman, near Oaxaca. | Photo: Reuters

Journalist Alberto Lopez Bello was recently found dead, along with a policeman, near Oaxaca. | Photo: Reuters

According to a report by a human rights group, since the start of Enrique Peña Nieto’s administration a journalist is attacked every 26.7 hours. Attacks and threats against Mexican journalists increased by 80 percent over the past two years, according to a report published Tuesday.

Article 19, a human rights organization focused on the defense and promotion of freedom of expression, presented the report titled “state of censorship.” The document states that under the administration of President Enrique Peña Nieto, an attack against a journalist occurs every 26.7 hours, compared to one every 48.1 hours during the presidency of Felipe Calderon.

During the first two years Peña Nieto’s government there were reported 656 assaults, 10 murders and 4 disappearances, including 122 attacks on female journalists.

The release of the report comes as controversy continues to swirl around the firing of Carmen Aristegui, one of Mexico’s most well-known journalist. Aristegui has stated that a dispute with her employer, MVS Radio, began as a result of a story she aired implicating Peña Nieto and his wife with the purchase of a house from a government contractor. She has also stated that she thinks the firing could only have come with Peña Nieto’s “blessing.”

According to international organizations, Mexico is one of the most dangerous countries in the world for journalists with on of the highest levels of unsolved crimes against the press. Authorities say criminal organizations target journalists to silence the press in the areas they operate. “Fear, impunity and violence are things that are too common for the press in Mexico,” Article 19 said.

Reporters Without Borders says at least 100 media workers have been killed since 2000, most of which remain unsolved.

http://www.telesurtv.net/english/news/Attacks-Against-Mexican-Journalists-up-80-Under-Pena-Nieto-20150325-0002.html.



March 25, 2015

Communiqué from San Sebastián Bachajón 23rd March 2015

Filed under: Bachajon — Tags: , — dorsetchiapassolidarity @ 9:05 pm

Communiqué from San Sebastián Bachajón 23rd March 2015

FROM EJIDO SAN SEBASTIAN BACHAJÓN, ADHERENTS TO THE SIXTH DECLARATION OF THE LACANDON JUNGLE, CHIAPAS, MEXICO, 23rd MARCH 2015

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To the General Command of the Clandestine Indigenous Revolutionary Committee of the Zapatista National Liberation Army

To the Good Government Juntas

To the Indigenous National Congress

To the compañer@s adherents to the Sixth Declaration of the Lacandón Jungle

To the mass and alternative media

To the Network for Solidarity and against Repression

To Movement for Justice in El Barrio from New York

To national and international human rights defenders

To the people of Mexico and the world

The support by the bad government for the paramilitary leaders Alejandro Moreno Gomez ejidal commissioner and the security consultant Samuel Diaz Guzman can be clearly seen when, on 21st March last, after they had set fire to the regional headquarters of San Sebastián, they verbally and physically assaulted a compañera and a compañero from the free media who had come with courage and dignity to document human rights violations by the bad federal and state government.

We reject the attacks on our compañera and compañero from the free media, and we hold the paramilitary chiefs Enrique Peña Nieto and Manuel Velasco Coello responsible for any other aggressions attempted against the free media and women and men of our organization.

Enough of so much abuse and corruption in order dispossess our people of the land and water, we will not allow it, we are not defeated, our struggle and resistance is for all of life and no matter if the government comes to sow terror and destruction, those from below will reconstruct as we were taught by our grandparents who also fought the lords of money and power.

From the northern zone of the state of Chiapas, the women and men of San Sebastián Bachajón send our combative greetings.

Never again a Mexico without us

Land and Freedom! Zapata Vive!

Hasta la victoria siempre!

Freedom for political prisoners!

Juan Vázquez Guzmán Lives, the Bachajón struggle continues!

Juan Carlos Gómez Silvano Lives, the Bachajón struggle continues!

No to the dispossession of indigenous territories!

Immediate presentation of the disappeared compañeros from Ayotzinapa!

JUSTICE FOR AYOTZINAPA, ACTEAL, ABC, ATENCO!



 

 

 

‘Disposable’ Farmworkers in San Quintín Valley Rise Up

Filed under: Human rights — Tags: , , — dorsetchiapassolidarity @ 9:00 pm

‘Disposable’ Farmworkers in San Quintín Valley Rise Up

Luis Hernández Navarro

La Jornada, 24th March, 2015

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The uprising of the day farmworkers in the San Quintín Valley could very well be a new chapter of México bárbaro. The working conditions that they suffer, the work stoppage and the seizure of highways in which they have played a leading role, are every bit as good as the dramatic narratives in John Kenneth Turner’s book, in which he documented the savage exploitation and slavery to which peasants and indigenous were subjected and recounted the labour strikes in Mexico during the Porfiriato.

The protests in San Quintín began on March 17 at three in the morning. In the boroughs that make up the valley, thousands of farm workers, led by their community leaders, headed out on the highway that crosses the Baja California Peninsula amid cries of “In struggle for the dignity of day labourers!” and “The people united will never be defeated!”

More than twenty videos uploaded to the Internet narrate in a piecemeal way the long, fast walks that men and women, summoned by the Alliance of National, State and Municipal Organizations for Social Justice, carried out on long stretches of federal roads, and how they set up small roadblocks with burning tyres and tree branches.

Recorded by the strikers themselves, this account bears witness to how along the way some young people threw stones at the windows of pawn shops and department stores, while others knocked down signs for farm names. Others—several of them children—throw themselves into looting shops, while the movement’s leaders condemn the excesses. One of the leaders warns: “We are poor, but we know respect. We come to win this struggle. We did not come to fight. We did not come to wreak havoc.”

Finally, moments can be seen when the police, supported along some stretches by a motor vehicle, fire rubber bullets at the protesters, breaking the roadblock, beating and arresting workers. The strikers—as Olga Alicia Aragón wrote in La Jornada—maintained the blockade for 120 kilometres [75 miles] of highway for 26 long hours.

San Quintín’s day farmworkers labour in humiliating conditions on farms that grow produce for export: tomatoes, strawberries, blackberries. In exchange for starvation wages, they work up to 14- hour days without a weekly day of rest, let alone holidays or social security. Foremen sexually abuse the women, and they are forced to take their children to the premises to perform work.

The farmworkers usually live in makeshift settlements that have become permanent. The settlements are overcrowded, lacking basic services; the houses have tin roofs and dirt floors. Many are indigenous migrants from Oaxaca (Mixtec and Triqui), Guerrero, Puebla and Veracruz, who have made San Quintín into another of their communities. Three generations of Oaxacalifornianos live there. They suffer constant police harassment. They rely on a single hospital [run by the] Mexican Social Security Institute [IMSS].

The farms on which they work are equipped with irrigation and high-tech equipment. These farms generate four-fifths of the value of the state’s agricultural production. Most of them are owned by 15 families and transnational consortia. Their owners are part of the state government.

These agricultural companies intensively exploit a cheap, abundant, easily replaceable manual labour pool; therefore, [they see them as] disposable. They have no need to take responsibility for ensuring decent conditions. If a worker becomes ill, dies or is exhausted, he is replaced by another at no cost. They squeeze the labourers as if they were oranges from which they need to extract the juice until they leave them converted into shells.

The companies do not respect the labour laws. They enjoy the willingness to please of the labour authorities and of unions of protection affiliated with the CTM [Confederation of Mexican Workers] and CROM [Regional Confederation of Mexican Workers]. In order to resist, agricultural workers were organized into groups like the Oaxacan Binational Indigenous Front (FIOB) and other ethno-political associations.

The revolt of the day farmworkers shows the unsustainability of this model of labour exploitation. The migrants’ settling down in the region, the development of forms of resistance and unprecedented class consciousness, and the total exasperation with employer abuse announce a new cycle of class struggle in the region. Precursor of the current struggle was the 1996-1997 agricultural work stoppage over three weeks’ non-payment of wages.

The Alliance of National, State and Municipal Organizations for Social Justice warned owners and government officials in every possible way of the imminent social explosion. Since last October, they have been saying that dialogue was necessary. Arrogant and insensitive, the state government never agreed.

Instead of understanding that this model of exploitation has now bumped up against the dignity and strength of the day farmworkers, government officials have wanted to discredit the strike movement by spreading the most absurd explanations of its origin. It is said, without providing a shred of evidence, that narcotrafficking is driving the protest, that it is organized by agitators from other states to create political instability, and that it aims to create problems for the governor ahead of the upcoming elections.

To the east, the uprising of the Baja California farmworkers has set off alarm bells among the horticultural entrepreneurs in Sinaloa. Guillermo Gastélum Bon Bustamante, president of the Culiacán River Farmers Association, has warned against the threat of what he calls “a type of virus that can replicate” in the Culiacán Valley.

Throughout this week, the day farmworkers of San Quintín have demonstrated that, contrary to what businessmen and politicians believed, they are not disposable. They are not just a labour force. They are, as they affirm, people of flesh and blood, indigenous workers proudly aware of their origin.

Translated by Jane Brundage

http://www.jornada.unam.mx/2015/03/24/index.php?section=opinion&article=014a1pol&partner=rss



March 22, 2015

“We have no home, they threw gasoline on and burned everything” denounce displaced indigenous in Chiapas.

Filed under: Displacement — Tags: , , — dorsetchiapassolidarity @ 8:02 pm

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“We have no home, they threw gasoline on and burned everything” denounce displaced indigenous in Chiapas.

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Las Margaritas, Chiapas, March 20th. “We are suffering here where we are, there is no water, and the children and our sister who is pregnant are suffering here,” said one of the mothers of the Tojolabal indigenous community Primero de Agosto, displaced last February 24th by the Independent Centre of Agricultural and Campesino Workers – Historical (CIOAC-H), in the municipality of Las Margaritas.

“Thanks to God, nothing happened to us when the people from CIOAC came to displace us with high-powered firearms. The children cried and we ran as if we were animals,” said the indigenous woman from the jungle border area, displaced together with her children and grandchildren.

“There are 12 of my family here, now we want to return, we want justice. The commissioner said clearly that the eviction was conducted by an order he had. Knowing who gave the order,” she said in evidence during a solidarity meeting of the neighbouring communities with the displaced families.

“We do not want them to come to provoke us here as well. We want it sorted out. We are eating here and we have no home,” she said from outside the camp where they have taken refuge, located on the stretch of road between Nuevo Momón and Monte Cristo Viejo.

“What we want is to return to our home. Please will countries demand that the government resolves the problem, because we are suffering a lot, because we have no water here,” is their invitation to the national and international community.

“They took away all our coffee plants, grabbed all our chickens. They pass through here and joke, they also did this before the eviction. We want them to give us all the things that were burned by the government,” the mother of the attacked family explains in the interview.

http://www.pozol.org/?p=10416

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Communiqué from San Sebastián Bachajón 21st March 2015

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Communiqué from San Sebastián Bachajón 21st March 2015

Public Forces burn down regional headquarters

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FROM EJIDO SAN SEBASTIAN BACHAJÓN, ADHERENTS TO THE SIXTH DECLARATION OF THE LACANDON JUNGLE, CHIAPAS, MEXICO, 21st MARCH 2015

To the General Command of the Clandestine Indigenous Revolutionary Committee of the Zapatista National Liberation Army

To the Good Government Juntas

To the Indigenous National Congress

To the compañer@s adherents to the Sixth Declaration of the Lacandón Jungle

To the mass and alternative media

To the Network for Solidarity and against Repression

To Movement for Justice in El Barrio from New York

To national and international human rights defenders

To the people of Mexico and the world

Compañeros and compañeras, we denounce that today, March 21, 2015 at around 8 o’clock in the morning more than 600 members of the public forces burned down our San Sebastián regional headquarters with the participation of the ejidal Commissioner Alejandro Moreno Gomez and the Security Adviser Samuel Díaz Guzmán. Once again the politics of death and the corruption of the bad government are demonstrated, and its contempt for the people and human rights because it seeks to achieve its ambition to get hold of our territory through the dispossession of the land, the water and everything that exists in our country, as if it were merchandise, in order to gain money.

We hold the paramilitary chiefs peña nieto and manuel velasco responsible for the violence in San Sebastián Bachajón and for the human rights violations, death and repression of women and men in our organization who do not sell their dignity in exchange for their crumbs.

We reject the tricks of the bad government to malign our struggle and fabricate crimes [and attribute them] to the organization which is defending the mother earth. Together with Alejandro Moreno Gómez the ejidal Commissioner and the Security Adviser Samuel Díaz Guzmán, they set up a roadblock on the road from Ocosingo to Palenque at the high point at the turning to agua azul in order to blame our organization for blocking the road, and also these lackeys of the bad government are cutting down trees and we know that they are fabricating crimes of ecocide so they can arrest the autonomous authorities of our organization.

We disclaim [any link to] these actions organized and supported by the bad government, together with the ejidal commissioner, they are only looking for a way to bend the law so they can put us in prison and dispossess us of our territory for transnational projects which only benefit those from above. After the violent eviction of January 9, 2015, we in our organization established the San Sebastián regional headquarters to continue caring for the land and to demand the withdrawal of bad government, this is where we will continue because we are the original peoples of these lands and we will not allow the bad government to come to command the people.

We remember today with dignified rage that it is a year since the killing of our compañero Juan Carlos Gómez Silvano, coordinator of the organization in the community of Virgen de Dolores, and next month will mark two years since the killing of our compañero Juan Vázquez Guzmán, secretary general of our organization, in whose memory the struggle in San Sebastián Bachajón continues.

We demand the withdrawal of public forces and of the national commission for protected natural areas from our lands, dispossessed since February 2011.

We demand freedom for our political prisoners Juan Antonio Gómez Silvano, Mario Aguilar Silvano and Roberto Gómez Hernández and of the unjustly imprisoned compañeros Santiago Moreno Perez, Emilio Jimenez Gomez and Esteban Gomez Jimenez.

From the northern zone of the state of Chiapas, the women and men of San Sebastián Bachajón send our combative greetings.

Never again a Mexico without us

Attentively

Land and Freedom! Zapata Vive!

Hasta la victoria siempre!

Freedom for political prisoners!

Juan Vázquez Guzmán Lives, the Bachajón struggle continues!

Juan Carlos Gómez Silvano Lives, the Bachajón struggle continues!

No to the dispossession of indigenous territories!

Immediate presentation of the disappeared compañeros from Ayotzinapa!

JUSTICE FOR AYOTZINAPA, ACTEAL, ABC, ATENCO!

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Chiapas: Believing People of Simojovel announce pilgrimage to Tuxtla to demand peace and justice

Filed under: Frayba, Indigenous — Tags: , — dorsetchiapassolidarity @ 5:08 pm

Chiapas: Believing People of Simojovel announce pilgrimage to Tuxtla to demand peace and justice

by SIPAZ

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The Believing People of Simojovel, during a press-conference held on 17 March at the Fray Bartolomé de las Casas Centre for Human Rights, (CDHFBC), called for a pilgrimage or way of the cross from 23 to 26 March as a means of peacefully denouncing the violence they experience in their region.  They compare this situation of violence at the state and national levels: “Simojovel is a small reflection of what is happening throughout the country: the institutionalized corruption governs at all levels, and for that reason the people must rise up and organize themselves to defend life.  What is at risk is human life, the future of our children, and of our daughters.”  The pilgrimage will be held from 23-26 March, leaving the first day from Simojovel and passing through the communities of Bochil, Ixtapa and Chiapa de Corzo, arriving on Thursday 26 March in the Chiapas capital of Tuxtla Gutiérrez.

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March 21, 2015

EZLN: About the Homage and the Seminar

Filed under: Uncategorized — dorsetchiapassolidarity @ 8:58 pm

EZLN: About the Homage and the Seminar

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33. la realidad

Sup Galeano.

ZAPATISTA ARMY FOR NATIONAL LIBERATION.

March 2015.

To the compas of the Sixth in Mexico and in the World:

Compas:

I have been asked to let you know that…

Despite the significant increase in military activity in the vicinity of the Zapatista Caracoles (aggressive patrols, intimidating checkpoints, threatening flyovers)—particularly in the caracoles of La Realidad and Oventik (the first has just opened a school-clinic, and the second will host the tribute to Don Luis Villoro Toranzo)…

Despite the growing belligerence of the paramilitary groups sponsored by the Chiapas government…

Despite the tired “new” lies in the paid media /no, there is not and there has not been any proposal for dialogue; no, not since 2001, that is to say that no federal official has approached the EZLN in the last 14 years for any reason other than in an attempt to assasinate the Zapatista leadership; no, the federal and state governments are not looking to improve the living conditions of indigenous people in Chiapas, rather, they are trying to divide communities; no, the only governmental approaches that Jaime Martinez Veloz claim for himself were not to Zapatistas but to the paramilitaries backed (before he took over) by Luis H. Alvarez, Juan Sabines Guerrero, Felipe Calderon Hinojosa, and now Manuel Velasco Coello, Rosario Robles Berlanga and Enrique Peña Nieto, one of whose groups (the CIOAC-H) is responsible for the murder of the compañero teacher Galeano; no, and so forth and so on/…

Despite the fact that truth and justice are still missing in Ayotzinapa…

Despite the fact that out there they’re busy with other things (more important things, right?) and that quickly changing trends in “mobilization” only prove that frivolousness is the overall strategy…

In spite of the fact that dignity reveals, time and again, reality / in the far north of Mexico it is discovered that there are still methods of exploitation from the time of President Porfirio Diaz. “In the North we work and have to support the lazy ones in South,” say the powerful; and while the fields are cultivated by men, women, children and elderly indigenous Triqui and Maya, the powerful say nothing and kneel before foreign power. In the Valle de San Quintin, Baja California, in what is known as Oaxacalifornia, the day laborers ask for fair wages and labor rights. They boil it down to few words: “we only want justice.” The government represses them “for going around like rowdy troublemakers”: 200 are detained. The governor, a PANista, meets with the commanders of the 67 infantry battalion of the federal army “to maintain social peace.” The top headline in the paid media is “007 in the Zócalo”. The hashtag #SanQuintinEnLucha isn’t trending /

In spite of it all…

Or precisely because of it all…

the EZLN confirms the celebration of:

– The homage to the compañero Luis Villoro Toranzo and Zapatista teacher Galeano, on May 2, 2015, in theCaracol of Oventic, Chiapas, Mexico. In this homage, in addition to the Zapatista compañeras and compañerosbases of support, the following people have confirmed their participation: Juan Villoro Ruiz, Fernanda Navarro, Adolfo Gilly, Pablo Gonzalez Casanova, Don Mario Gonzalez Contreras, father of César Manuel Gonzalez Hernandez, one of the 46 missing from Ayotzinapa, and Doña Bertha Nava, mother of Julio Cesar Ramirez Nava, one of the 46 missing from Ayotzinapa; as well as family members of compañero teacher Galeano and Zapatista autonomous authorities of the 5 zones.

– The kick-off of the seminar “Critical Thought Versus the Capitalist Hydra,” convoked by CIDECI-Unitierra and the EZLN’s Sixth Commission on May 3-9, 2015, in the mountains of the Mexican southeast. I have been told that the following people have confirmed their participation in the Seminar:

Doña Bertha Nava, Don Mario González Contreras and Doña Hilda Hernández Rivera, (family members of Ayotzinapa’s missing 46). Pablo González Casanova. Adolfo Gilly. Juan Villoro Ruiz. Elena Álvarez-Buylla. Catherine Marielle. Álvaro Salgado. Alicia Castellanos. Óscar Olivera (Bolivia). Margarita Millán. Sylvia Marcos. Mariana Favela. Karla Quiñonez (USA). Xuno López. Jean Robert. Carlos González. María Eugenia Sánchez Díaz de Rivera. Eduardo Almeida Acosta. Vilma Almendra (Colombia). Philippe Corcuff (France). Luis Lozano Arredondo. Juan Wahrem (Argentina). Rosa Albina Garabito. Jerónimo Díaz. Rubén Trejo. Manuel Rosenthal (Colombia). Hugo Blanco (Perú). Juan Carlos Mijangos Noh. Greg Ruggeiro (USA). Ana Lydia Flores Marín. Javier Hernández Alpízar. Pablo Reyna. Christine Pellicane (France). Efraín Herrera. Domi. Antonio Ramírez. John Berger (Great Britain). Donovan Hernández. Sergio Rodríguez. Raúl Zibechi (Uruguay). Sergio Tischler Visquerra (Guatemala). Jorge Alonso. Jerome Baschet (France). Paulina Fernández C. Carlos Aguirre Rojas. Gilberto López y Rivas. Daniel Inclán. Enzo Traverso (Italy). Silvia Federici (Italy). Immanuel Wallerstein (USA). John Holloway (Ireland). Michael Lowy (Brazil-France). Marcos Roitman (Chile-Spanish State).

From the concierge of the Little School, stacking boxes and more boxes marked “FLUNKEES.”

Mexico, March 2015.

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Section entitled “From the Diaries of the Cat-Dog”

On options:

Imagine you are having a nightmare. You find yourself in the midst of a desolated landscape. Not like after a war, but rather as if in the midst of its horror. On the right side of the road dividing the landscape is a modern building complex. At the entrance, a sign gives notice or warning: “Visions of Reality Mall.” Two modern imposing buildings stand out. The marquee for one of them reads, “Course in Ethical Jounralism and Objetive Reporting. Taught by: Ciro Gómez Leyva, Ricardo Alemán, Joaquín López Dóriga, Javier Alatorre and Laura Bozzo.” The building by its side announces: “Course in Ethical Journalism and Objetive Reporting. Taught by: Jacobo Zabludovski and 4 others from the only remaining free and independent spaces.”

You, a discerning person, of course, tolerant, of course, inclusive, of course, civilized, of course, reasonable, of course, with reasoned arguments, of course, educated, of course, with an actual e-d-u-c-a-t-i-o-n, of course. Even in your nightmares you maintain your composure, obviously.

That’s why you understand why there are long lines to get into one place or the other.

You are feeling self-congratulatory due to the fact that there are informational options for every preference when you hear, in a corner to the left, a little girl trying to play the tune of “the long and winding road” by the Beatles on her school flute.

You, unable to hide your irritation at the child’s off-key notes, realize that on the left side of this long and torturous road there is a group of beings (incomprehensible, of course), constructing little huts (miserable little things, of course), and their signs do not offer courses or discounts, of course, but rather manage only to stammer “free, autonomous, alternative, or whatever you call them media.”

You are faced then with a dilemma: either you—generously of course—widen your criteria, your tolerance, your inclusiveness, your civility toward this side of the road; or you feel grateful that there are things that never go out of style (like the bulldozer, the nightstick, the police, the antiriot squads). You are paralyzed in the face of this complex dilemma. Since you don’t know what to do, your smartphone—thanks to a modern application that gives you a zap whenever the hard drive is reconfigured (yours, of course)—activates in order to awaken you. You come to attention, but everything looks the same: the war landscape, the fancy buildings on the right side, the poor ones on the left. Ah, but instead of the out-of-tune flute playing “the long and winding road” you hear a disconcerting rhythm, a mix of ballad-cumbia-corrido-ranchera-tropical-hiphop-ska-heavy-metal that, played on the marimba, launches into “Ya se mira el horizonte…” [the Zapatista anthem].

In that terrible situation you know that you have to take drastic measures. But you can’t decide, should I get a new cell phone, or just update the operating system? That, my friend, is a real dilemma. But vote or not vote, what is that??

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On the paid media:

– They say that those wise men and women, of grand studies and knowledge, realized that what the ignorant, illiterate, and premodern indigenous said was true: “in capitalism, the one who pays rules.”

– On the “five free and independent spaces” and Molotov: uh oh, it seems that Jacobo did make someone stupid.[1]

On postmodernity:

– Note to divers: the pool doesn’t have water, just shit. Proceed with caut…. Splash!

– Break-up conversation of a postmodern couple: It’s not you, it’s the context.”

On the seminar:

– The following message came from Italy: “So-and-so said he would only attend (the seminar) if he could personally talk to subcomandante insurgente marcos.” When the deceased heard that, thinking the message was from Monica Bellucci, he began to stir in his grave. Later they told him who the message was from and, disappointed, the deceased settled back down. SupMoy said to just send a message back that “il supmarcos e morto, se volete, potete cercare in inferno” [italian in original] along with a calendar. Questioned on the subject by Los Tercios Compas S.A. (without) C. (nor) V. of (i)R. (i) L.[2] (note: use of this brand prohibited without the express written consent of those who (can’t) pay for it), SupMoy declared “the thing is that there are people who don’t realize that we are in 2015.

– Pst. Pst. The organization of the seminar is a mess. But pretend you didn’t hear that. Place yourself in harmony with the universe. Now repeat with me “ommmm, the seminar is already organized, ommmm.”

I testify: meow-woof (and vice versa).

[1]“Que no te haga bobo Jacobo” (Don’t Let Jacobo make you stupid) is a song by Molotov referring to media giant Televisa’s ex-anchor Jacobo Zabludovsky.

[2] S.A. de C.V. de R.L. in Spanish stands for Sociedad Anonima de Capital Variable de Responsibilidad Limitada, or Anonymous Society of Variable Capital, Limited Liability. The formulation here, S.A. (sin)C (ni) V de (i)R (i)L, would mean Anonymous Society (without) Capital (nor) variable capital of (un)limited (ir)responsibility.

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600 members of the public forces burn down the regional headquarters of San Sebastian Bachajón

Filed under: Bachajon, Displacement, Human rights, Indigenous, Repression — Tags: , — dorsetchiapassolidarity @ 5:50 pm

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600 members of the public forces burn down the regional headquarters of San Sebastian Bachajón

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bachajon6

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“Compañeros and compañeras, we denounce that today March 21, 2015 at 8 o’clock in the morning more than 600 members of the public forces burned our regional headquarters known as San Sebastián, with the participation of the ejidal Commissioner Alejandro Moreno Gómez and the Security Adviser Samuel Díaz Guzmán. Once again the politics of death and the corruption of the bad government are demonstrated, and its contempt for the people and human rights because it seeks to achieve its ambition to get hold of our territory through the dispossession of the land, the water and everything that exists in our country, in order to gain money, as if it were merchandise.

We hold the paramilitary chiefs peña nieto and manuel velasco responsible for the violence in San Sebastián Bachajón and for the human rights violations, death and repression of women and men in our organization who do not sell their dignity in exchange for their crumbs.”

Adherents to the Sixth, ejido San Sebastián Bachajón

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Bachajón reports new threat of dispossession

Filed under: Bachajon, Displacement, Indigenous, La Sexta — Tags: , — dorsetchiapassolidarity @ 3:19 pm

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Bachajón reports new threat of dispossession

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March 20, 2015

The compañeros of the ejido San Sebastian Bachajón, adherents to the Sixth Declaration of the Lacandon Jungle, report that the roadblock conducted by political party supporters at the turning to the waterfalls of Agua Azul, which started on 17th March, is continuing; now it is the people of Commissioner Alejandro Moreno Gómez (ejidal Commissioner) and Samuel Díaz Guzmán (vigilance councillor) who are in charge of this.

The ejidatarios informed us by telephone that the Commissioner is organizing his people to evict the compañeros from San José en Rebeldia and from the  “San Sebastian” Regional  Headquarters, land recuperated by the compañeros of San Sebastián Bachajón.

The compañeros will not give up the struggle for the defence of their land and territory and for the release of their prisoners.

We ask that you remain aware of the situation of the compañeros.

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http://kolectivozero.blogspot.co.uk/2015/03/denuncia-bachajon-nueva-amenaza-de.html

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