dorset chiapas solidarity

April 11, 2016

Oxfam Presents Inequality Report

Filed under: sipaz — Tags: , , , , — dorsetchiapassolidarity @ 9:17 am

 

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Oxfam Presents Inequality Report

 

Oxfam.pngPhoto @ Oxfam

According to the international NGO Oxfam, the growing inequality crisis has become a recurring theme on international agendas due to the effects that this has on the world population. Mexico, Oaxaca and Chiapas are examples of this. On March 31, a group of researchers from the Autonomous University of Chiapas (UNACH in its Spanish acronym), from the Isitame Collective and from Oxfam Mexico presented the report “Inequality and Social Exclusion in Chiapas, a Long Term View.”

Specifically, the document seeks to “find a reason for the inequalities in Mexico that different regions of the country experience, from territorial to local constructions as well as the solutions that can be locally outlined.” The report points out that Chiapas is considered to be “the state with the highest concentration of population in conditions of poverty and extreme poverty. As a result of a historical process of high rates of population growth, recurring crises and economic stagnation, a vicious circle of poverty and inequality has been generated, which reports the highest levels in all areas of poverty and inequality in the entity.” Jorge Alberto Lopez Arevalo, one of the researchers, commented that between 1995 and 2014 almost 40 million dollars have been invested in Social Development in Chiapas, a shocking figure, but poverty has not diminished. On the contrary, it is on the increase. ” We can say that this is the failure of social policy”, he said.

Extreme Inequality and Development Tendencies. The Case of the Oaxaca State” was also presented in the report, produced in collaboration between Services for an Alternative Education (Servicios para una Educación Alternativa A.C. – EDUCA) and Oxfam Mexico in Oaxaca State on March 29. According to the report, Oaxaca not only suffers from income poverty but also lack of social rights, which prevents equal access to development opportunities for the population. According to the study carried out, “this poverty and inequality favored the growth of drug addiction and alcoholism among the inhabitants.” Although the report does not specifically address inequality among women, it reveals that some elements of social policy, such as those aimed at empowering women, in fact increase work duties for them while other programs also increase their responsibilities. It also evaluates mega-projects and points out that the refinery at Salina Cruz, for example, has not had an impact on the welfare of the population and that wind farm projects have resulted in the dispossession of lands in the region of Tehuantepec Isthmus.

Ricardo Fuentes of Oxfam Mexico said that there is a growing tendency of inequality and that it is a world phenomenon that Oxfam has been warning about since 2014, when they revealed that 85 people possess more wealth than half of the population of the world. As a result of their analysis they published the document “Extreme Inequality. Concentration of Economic and Political Power” in June 2015, in which they warned about the gap between those who have everything and those who have nothing.

https://sipazen.wordpress.com/2016/04/09/oaxacachiapasnational-oxfam-presents-inequality-report/

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April 8, 2016

More than 20 Years of Million-Dollar Support for Economic Development and Chiapas Remains as Poor as Ever

Filed under: Indigenous — Tags: , — dorsetchiapassolidarity @ 11:34 am

 

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More than 20 Years of Million-Dollar Support for Economic Development and Chiapas Remains as Poor as Ever

 

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By: Isaín Mandujano

Chiapas is the state that has received the most resources to combat poverty in the whole country during the last 20 years; nevertheless, measurements demonstrate that poverty has not been reduced; on the contrary, it seems to have increased in a slow but sustained way. [1]

This is what they concluded in the presentation of the report “Inequality and Social Exclusion in Chiapas, a long-term view,” realized by Chiapas social and economic researchers and financed by the international organisation Oxfam México.

The document elaborated by Jorge López Arévalo and Gerardo Núñez Medina, two researchers from the Autonomous University of Chiapas (UNACH) reveals the critical situation that exists in Chiapas, which since the 1994 armed uprising has received millions of dollars that have had little impact among the state’s indigenous and campesino communities.

Elvia Quintanar Quintanar, coordinator of the research project, said that a large part of the reason these resources have no impact, is the corruption with which the bureaucratic government apparatus in Chiapas is plagued at every level, federal, state and municipal

He said that the lack of any transparency and the absence of accountability favour a recurring corruption that doesn’t end in Chiapas and that consequently, of the resources (funds) that are designated for fighting poverty, only a few drops reach the recipients.

Ricardo Fuentes from Oxfam México said that there is a growing tendency towards inequality, and that this is a global phenomenon which Oxfam has warned about since 2014, when it revealed that 85 people possess more wealth than half of the world’s population.

He explained that the inequality crisis that the world is experiencing has special characteristics, which is why, in June 2015, Oxfam México published the document “Extreme Inequality in Mexico: The concentration of economic and political power,” wherein they warned about the gap that exists between those who have it all and those who have nothing.

“We found that in Mexico the fortunes of four people grew five times in the period 1996-2014, while, in the same period, the per capita GNP grew at less than 1% annually. The country with 55.3 million people in poverty is also the country of some of the richest men – yes, men – in the world. “Many Mexicos,” is a common phrase, but no less true for all that,” Ricardo Fuentes said.

He added that the document presented on Thursday in Chiapas specifically seeks to give a reason for the inequalities that exist in different regions of Mexico, their causes and consequences from territorial and communitarian constructions; as well as the exit routes that can be sketched from the local.

“A system in which it is possible for 55 million people to live in poverty worries us,” he indicated.

The report points out that Chiapas is considered as the state with the highest concentration of its population in poverty and extreme poverty. Consequently, it is the state that has received the most resources (money) in Programmes to Combat Poverty over the last 20 years. However, the measurements show that it (poverty) has not been reduced; on the contrary, it seems to increase slowly but surely.

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The document is divided into four parts: Inequality in Chiapas: the problems on the inside and the outside; Social inequalities: the difference between being born into an indigenous family and into a mestizo family; Inequalities and public expenditures; and Development with equity: Conclusions and proposals.

(….)

The document emphasizes that Chiapas has experienced a slow growth for more than a century, which has deepened in the last 35 years, configuring a weak and unstructured job market: it presents the lowest rate of salaried work at the national level, and one of the highest rates of informal working, which reached 80% in the second quarter of 2015.

It points out that inside of Chiapas, the precariousness of employment, added to the loss of the real value of wages, are the principal determinants of economic inequalities. In addition, access to job opportunities is tied to discriminatory factors that worsen the fragile situation of the indigenous populations.

The report says that during the last century, the population of Chiapas increased and the economy grew; nevertheless, the living conditions of its inhabitants did not improve.

In 2010, Chiapas ranked seventh in terms of population on a national level, with a total population of 4.79 million inhabitants. In economic terms, the same year it generated 1.8% of the GNP and ranked 19th, while it came last in the country’s per capita GNP.

As a result of a historic process with high rates of population growth, recurring crises and economic stagnation, a vicious circle has been generated between poverty and inequality so that the state reports the highest indices of poverty and inequality in every area.

 

An important Note

[1] Although it is not specifically stated in this article, it is almost certain that Zapatista communities are not represented in this report because the EZLN does not permit this type of research in its civilian communities. Importantly, this study would seem to support the recent EZLN communiqué regarding the deteriorating condition of the non-Zapatista communities affiliated with the political parties.

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Originally Published in Spanish by Chiapas Paralelo

Friday, April 1, 2016

http://www.chiapasparalelo.com/noticias/chiapas/2016/04/mas-de-20-anos-de-millonaria-de-derrama-economica-y-chiapas-sigue-igual-de-pobre/

Re-published with English interpretation by the Chiapas Support Committee

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April 3, 2016

US $60 billion later, Chiapas no better off

Filed under: Human rights, Indigenous, Uncategorized — Tags: , — dorsetchiapassolidarity @ 11:12 am

 

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US $60 billion later, Chiapas no better off

 

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Poverty has worsened over 24 years in Mexico’s poorest state

Mexico News Daily | Friday, April 1, 2016

The state of Chiapas has received nearly US $60 billion through poverty alleviation programs during the last 24 years, yet poverty is worse today in Mexico’s poorest state.

Several national and international organizations this week presented a report entitled “Inequality and Social Exclusion in Chiapas, a Long Term View,” in which specialists reached the conclusion that the contrasts between investment and poverty clearly show a great failure, leaving the state with the highest levels of inequality and poverty in the country.

Despite all the money invested in the state, 86% of its population is considered to be below the food poverty line, according to data collected by the National Council for the Evaluation of Social Development Policy (Coneval).

“When the investment in social development programs and the evolution of poverty in the state are considered alongside, the results suggest that [the programs] have been ineffective, both in relative and absolute terms,” said the report.

Between the years 1990 and 2010, food poverty increased by 46.2%, capability poverty (a measurement of human capabilities) grew from 55.1 to 58%, and material poverty from 75.1 to 78%.

Illiteracy is another of the state’s great woes: 21% of women and 13.5% of men can’t read or write, and the state’s average for the number of years spent in school is 7.2, well below the national figure of 9.1. In the case of indigenous communities, that average drops to 3.8 years.

The document proposes rejigging social expenditures, leaving  the welfare state behind while moving forward with job creation, among other proposals.

The report is the product of a coordinated effort by several institutions, including the Autonomous University of Chiapas, Oxfam Mexico and Chiapas’ ISITAME Collective.

Source: Reforma (sp)

 

http://mexiconewsdaily.com/news/chiapas-poverty

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October 31, 2015

State Racism Condemns Mexican Indigenous to Prison and Poverty

Filed under: Indigenous — Tags: , , — dorsetchiapassolidarity @ 3:06 pm

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State Racism Condemns Mexican Indigenous to Prison and Poverty

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"Discrimination and racism permeate the state, institutions and society, when native people are perceived as needy, lacking, impotent," said Leticia Aparicio Soriano. | Photo: EFE

“Discrimination and racism permeate the state, institutions and society, when native people are perceived as needy, lacking, impotent,” said Leticia Aparicio Soriano. | Photo: EFE

Stereotypes in Mexico exclude indigenous people from developing policy to address their problems, rights activists say.

More than 8,000 indigenous people are serving sentences in Mexico’s state and federal prisons because of institutionalized racism, indigenous rights advocates said Tuesday.

At the conference “Indigenous Peoples: Social Disadvantages, Access to Rights and Justice,” various indigenous leaders convened to discuss the structural problems their people face in Mexico, home to nearly 16 million indigenous people.

“Discrimination and racism permeate the state, institutions and society,” said Leticia Aparicio Soriano from the National School of Social Work at the National Autonomous University of Mexico. “Native people are perceived as needy, lacking, impotent,”

These forces of discrimination mean indigenous people are not considered social actors who can also propose, organize and develop public policies to protect and enhance their rights, Aparicio said.

The Mexican state’s unwillingness to shape policies in consultation with indigenous communities has produced higher levels of poverty and limited access to social services while keeping native languages unprotected, organizers mentioned, according to news agency Notimex.

In addition, the lack of judicial assistance, cultural sensitivity and due process has led to thousands of indigenous people serving sentences in judicial and federal prisons, explained Maria Amparo Gutierrez Reyes, legal representative of the Mexican Indigenous Women’s Network.
http://www.telesurtv.net/english/news/State-Racism-Condemns-Mexican-Indigenous-to-Prison-and-Poverty-20151027-0047.html

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June 26, 2015

Mexico’s Extreme Inequality: 1% Owns Half of the Country’s Wealth

Filed under: Indigenous — Tags: , , — dorsetchiapassolidarity @ 6:52 pm

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Mexico’s Extreme Inequality: 1% Owns Half of the Country’s Wealth

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The report points to some major consequences of extreme inequality, including indigenous poverty occurring at a rate four times the national average and increased violence caused by marginalization. Extreme inequality has increased in Mexico while the economy has stagnated, concentrating almost half of the country’s wealth in the hands of its elite 1 percent, according to a new Oxfam report. According to the report, the wealth of the Mexico’s 16 billionaires multiplies fivefold each year, while the country’s GDP increases by less than 1 percent annually. Mexico is among the top 14 richest countries in the world by GDP, yet over half its population, or 53 million people, live in poverty.

The report states that one of the most serious aspects of inequality is unbalanced income distribution, which is becoming more pronounced. Mexico’s telecommunications tycoon Carlos Slim is the second richest person in the world. His estimated 5 percent return on wealth alone could cover the cost of some 2 million low wage workers at the minimum wage rate of US$4.50 per day. The wealth of Slim and just three fellow Mexican billionaires account for 9 percent of the country’s GDP, equivalent to the income of nearly 20 million Mexicans on the other side of the inequality equation. The impacts of severe inequality are not only economic, but also political. “We are concerned with the excessive and undue influence of economic and private powers in public policies and how this interferes with the exercise of citizens’ rights,” says the report. “The people most affected by this are the poorest.”

CIRErXFWwAAAGk-Facing the harmful impacts of such a massive gap between rich and poor, the report identifies access to services with a focus on human rights, raising the minimum wage, progressive fiscal policy, and tax transparency and accountability as key future priorities in the fight against poverty and inequality. An Oxfam petition, as part of a global campaign against inequality, is calling on members of Mexico’s congress to pay attention to the needs of Mexican people and “end the vicious cycle of inequality” by prioritizing public spending on education, healthcare, and other basic services. The report also points to other major consequences of extreme inequality, including indigenous poverty occurring at a rate four times the national average and increased violence caused by marginalization. In January, an Oxfam global inequality report revealed that the poorest half of the world population collectively controls as much wealth as the world’s 80 richest people, down from 85 in 2014, showing a further concentration of global wealth.

http://www.telesurtv.net/english/news/Mexicos-Extreme-Inequality-1-Owns-Half-of-Countrys-Wealth-20150625-0034.html.

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May 17, 2015

2 children dead and 6 gravely ill following immunizations in Simojovel

Filed under: Indigenous — Tags: , , , — dorsetchiapassolidarity @ 3:45 pm

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2 children dead and 6 gravely ill following immunizations in Simojovel

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Following the application of an immunization campaign to 52 indigenous children from the Simojovel municipality, 29 of them had adverse reactions and had to be hospitalized.  Two have died, and six others have been seriously injured.  The perished newborns, Yadira (30 days of age) and Emmanuel Francisco (28 days), had not yet been officially registered.

The Mexican Social Security Institute (IMSS) announced on 9 May that it would suspend only the application of Hepatitis B immunizations within the Simojovel municipality, thus overturning the previous order to suspend the BCG (tuberculosis), Hepatitis B, Rotavirus, and Quadrivalent immunizations at the national level, and to contain the Hepatitis B lots as the suspected cause of the adverse reactions.

The Chiapas state governor, Manuel Velasco, and the director general of the IMSS, José Antonio González Anaya, visited those affected and their relatives in the Tuxtla Gutiérrez hospital, where they have been admitted.

images1Civil-society organizations have demanded that the State authorities investigate the incident in a profound and impartial way, and they called on the appropriate authorities to determine the chain of culpability among those responsible, as well as to provide the necessary support for families, in addition to access to justice.  They expressed their “concern for the situation of newborns in the State, particularly those who subsist in conditions of extreme material poverty.  Data from the National Council on the Evaluation of the Politics of Social Development (CONEVAL) indicate that, in 2012, 74.7% of the Chiapas population finds itself in extreme poverty, with 24.9% reporting lack of access to health services.  It is notable that this outcome, which has to do with immunizations, takes place in one of the states with greatest material need in the country, where the percentage of unvaccinated children is 18%, and the mortality rate of infants is 13.5 deaths higher than the national average of 13.2 (2010), in accordance with the official data that are presented in the report Infancy Counts in Mexico.”

https://sipazen.wordpress.com/2015/05/17/chiapas-2-children-perished-and-6-gravely-injured-following-immunizations-in-simojovel/

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