dorset chiapas solidarity

March 25, 2015

Communiqué from San Sebastián Bachajón 23rd March 2015

Filed under: Bachajon — Tags: , — dorsetchiapassolidarity @ 9:05 pm

Communiqué from San Sebastián Bachajón 23rd March 2015

FROM EJIDO SAN SEBASTIAN BACHAJÓN, ADHERENTS TO THE SIXTH DECLARATION OF THE LACANDON JUNGLE, CHIAPAS, MEXICO, 23rd MARCH 2015

bacha

To the General Command of the Clandestine Indigenous Revolutionary Committee of the Zapatista National Liberation Army

To the Good Government Juntas

To the Indigenous National Congress

To the compañer@s adherents to the Sixth Declaration of the Lacandón Jungle

To the mass and alternative media

To the Network for Solidarity and against Repression

To Movement for Justice in El Barrio from New York

To national and international human rights defenders

To the people of Mexico and the world

The support by the bad government for the paramilitary leaders Alejandro Moreno Gomez ejidal commissioner and the security consultant Samuel Diaz Guzman can be clearly seen when, on 21st March last, after they had set fire to the regional headquarters of San Sebastián, they verbally and physically assaulted a compañera and a compañero from the free media who had come with courage and dignity to document human rights violations by the bad federal and state government.

We reject the attacks on our compañera and compañero from the free media, and we hold the paramilitary chiefs Enrique Peña Nieto and Manuel Velasco Coello responsible for any other aggressions attempted against the free media and women and men of our organization.

Enough of so much abuse and corruption in order dispossess our people of the land and water, we will not allow it, we are not defeated, our struggle and resistance is for all of life and no matter if the government comes to sow terror and destruction, those from below will reconstruct as we were taught by our grandparents who also fought the lords of money and power.

From the northern zone of the state of Chiapas, the women and men of San Sebastián Bachajón send our combative greetings.

Never again a Mexico without us

Land and Freedom! Zapata Vive!

Hasta la victoria siempre!

Freedom for political prisoners!

Juan Vázquez Guzmán Lives, the Bachajón struggle continues!

Juan Carlos Gómez Silvano Lives, the Bachajón struggle continues!

No to the dispossession of indigenous territories!

Immediate presentation of the disappeared compañeros from Ayotzinapa!

JUSTICE FOR AYOTZINAPA, ACTEAL, ABC, ATENCO!



 

 

 

‘Disposable’ Farmworkers in San Quintín Valley Rise Up

Filed under: Human rights — Tags: , , — dorsetchiapassolidarity @ 9:00 pm

‘Disposable’ Farmworkers in San Quintín Valley Rise Up

Luis Hernández Navarro

La Jornada, 24th March, 2015

10405236_402849066561910_6789705084168803119_n
The uprising of the day farmworkers in the San Quintín Valley could very well be a new chapter of México bárbaro. The working conditions that they suffer, the work stoppage and the seizure of highways in which they have played a leading role, are every bit as good as the dramatic narratives in John Kenneth Turner’s book, in which he documented the savage exploitation and slavery to which peasants and indigenous were subjected and recounted the labour strikes in Mexico during the Porfiriato.

The protests in San Quintín began on March 17 at three in the morning. In the boroughs that make up the valley, thousands of farm workers, led by their community leaders, headed out on the highway that crosses the Baja California Peninsula amid cries of “In struggle for the dignity of day labourers!” and “The people united will never be defeated!”

More than twenty videos uploaded to the Internet narrate in a piecemeal way the long, fast walks that men and women, summoned by the Alliance of National, State and Municipal Organizations for Social Justice, carried out on long stretches of federal roads, and how they set up small roadblocks with burning tyres and tree branches.

Recorded by the strikers themselves, this account bears witness to how along the way some young people threw stones at the windows of pawn shops and department stores, while others knocked down signs for farm names. Others—several of them children—throw themselves into looting shops, while the movement’s leaders condemn the excesses. One of the leaders warns: “We are poor, but we know respect. We come to win this struggle. We did not come to fight. We did not come to wreak havoc.”

Finally, moments can be seen when the police, supported along some stretches by a motor vehicle, fire rubber bullets at the protesters, breaking the roadblock, beating and arresting workers. The strikers—as Olga Alicia Aragón wrote in La Jornada—maintained the blockade for 120 kilometres [75 miles] of highway for 26 long hours.

San Quintín’s day farmworkers labour in humiliating conditions on farms that grow produce for export: tomatoes, strawberries, blackberries. In exchange for starvation wages, they work up to 14- hour days without a weekly day of rest, let alone holidays or social security. Foremen sexually abuse the women, and they are forced to take their children to the premises to perform work.

The farmworkers usually live in makeshift settlements that have become permanent. The settlements are overcrowded, lacking basic services; the houses have tin roofs and dirt floors. Many are indigenous migrants from Oaxaca (Mixtec and Triqui), Guerrero, Puebla and Veracruz, who have made San Quintín into another of their communities. Three generations of Oaxacalifornianos live there. They suffer constant police harassment. They rely on a single hospital [run by the] Mexican Social Security Institute [IMSS].

The farms on which they work are equipped with irrigation and high-tech equipment. These farms generate four-fifths of the value of the state’s agricultural production. Most of them are owned by 15 families and transnational consortia. Their owners are part of the state government.

These agricultural companies intensively exploit a cheap, abundant, easily replaceable manual labour pool; therefore, [they see them as] disposable. They have no need to take responsibility for ensuring decent conditions. If a worker becomes ill, dies or is exhausted, he is replaced by another at no cost. They squeeze the labourers as if they were oranges from which they need to extract the juice until they leave them converted into shells.

The companies do not respect the labour laws. They enjoy the willingness to please of the labour authorities and of unions of protection affiliated with the CTM [Confederation of Mexican Workers] and CROM [Regional Confederation of Mexican Workers]. In order to resist, agricultural workers were organized into groups like the Oaxacan Binational Indigenous Front (FIOB) and other ethno-political associations.

The revolt of the day farmworkers shows the unsustainability of this model of labour exploitation. The migrants’ settling down in the region, the development of forms of resistance and unprecedented class consciousness, and the total exasperation with employer abuse announce a new cycle of class struggle in the region. Precursor of the current struggle was the 1996-1997 agricultural work stoppage over three weeks’ non-payment of wages.

The Alliance of National, State and Municipal Organizations for Social Justice warned owners and government officials in every possible way of the imminent social explosion. Since last October, they have been saying that dialogue was necessary. Arrogant and insensitive, the state government never agreed.

Instead of understanding that this model of exploitation has now bumped up against the dignity and strength of the day farmworkers, government officials have wanted to discredit the strike movement by spreading the most absurd explanations of its origin. It is said, without providing a shred of evidence, that narcotrafficking is driving the protest, that it is organized by agitators from other states to create political instability, and that it aims to create problems for the governor ahead of the upcoming elections.

To the east, the uprising of the Baja California farmworkers has set off alarm bells among the horticultural entrepreneurs in Sinaloa. Guillermo Gastélum Bon Bustamante, president of the Culiacán River Farmers Association, has warned against the threat of what he calls “a type of virus that can replicate” in the Culiacán Valley.

Throughout this week, the day farmworkers of San Quintín have demonstrated that, contrary to what businessmen and politicians believed, they are not disposable. They are not just a labour force. They are, as they affirm, people of flesh and blood, indigenous workers proudly aware of their origin.

Translated by Jane Brundage

http://www.jornada.unam.mx/2015/03/24/index.php?section=opinion&article=014a1pol&partner=rss



March 22, 2015

“We have no home, they threw gasoline on and burned everything” denounce displaced indigenous in Chiapas.

Filed under: Displacement — Tags: , , — dorsetchiapassolidarity @ 8:02 pm

.

“We have no home, they threw gasoline on and burned everything” denounce displaced indigenous in Chiapas.

.

SAM_1128

Las Margaritas, Chiapas, March 20th. “We are suffering here where we are, there is no water, and the children and our sister who is pregnant are suffering here,” said one of the mothers of the Tojolabal indigenous community Primero de Agosto, displaced last February 24th by the Independent Centre of Agricultural and Campesino Workers – Historical (CIOAC-H), in the municipality of Las Margaritas.

“Thanks to God, nothing happened to us when the people from CIOAC came to displace us with high-powered firearms. The children cried and we ran as if we were animals,” said the indigenous woman from the jungle border area, displaced together with her children and grandchildren.

“There are 12 of my family here, now we want to return, we want justice. The commissioner said clearly that the eviction was conducted by an order he had. Knowing who gave the order,” she said in evidence during a solidarity meeting of the neighbouring communities with the displaced families.

“We do not want them to come to provoke us here as well. We want it sorted out. We are eating here and we have no home,” she said from outside the camp where they have taken refuge, located on the stretch of road between Nuevo Momón and Monte Cristo Viejo.

“What we want is to return to our home. Please will countries demand that the government resolves the problem, because we are suffering a lot, because we have no water here,” is their invitation to the national and international community.

“They took away all our coffee plants, grabbed all our chickens. They pass through here and joke, they also did this before the eviction. We want them to give us all the things that were burned by the government,” the mother of the attacked family explains in the interview.

http://www.pozol.org/?p=10416

.


Communiqué from San Sebastián Bachajón 21st March 2015

.

Communiqué from San Sebastián Bachajón 21st March 2015

Public Forces burn down regional headquarters

 20150208_101135_mx_chiapas_bachajon_w1024_par_valk

FROM EJIDO SAN SEBASTIAN BACHAJÓN, ADHERENTS TO THE SIXTH DECLARATION OF THE LACANDON JUNGLE, CHIAPAS, MEXICO, 21st MARCH 2015

To the General Command of the Clandestine Indigenous Revolutionary Committee of the Zapatista National Liberation Army

To the Good Government Juntas

To the Indigenous National Congress

To the compañer@s adherents to the Sixth Declaration of the Lacandón Jungle

To the mass and alternative media

To the Network for Solidarity and against Repression

To Movement for Justice in El Barrio from New York

To national and international human rights defenders

To the people of Mexico and the world

Compañeros and compañeras, we denounce that today, March 21, 2015 at around 8 o’clock in the morning more than 600 members of the public forces burned down our San Sebastián regional headquarters with the participation of the ejidal Commissioner Alejandro Moreno Gomez and the Security Adviser Samuel Díaz Guzmán. Once again the politics of death and the corruption of the bad government are demonstrated, and its contempt for the people and human rights because it seeks to achieve its ambition to get hold of our territory through the dispossession of the land, the water and everything that exists in our country, as if it were merchandise, in order to gain money.

We hold the paramilitary chiefs peña nieto and manuel velasco responsible for the violence in San Sebastián Bachajón and for the human rights violations, death and repression of women and men in our organization who do not sell their dignity in exchange for their crumbs.

We reject the tricks of the bad government to malign our struggle and fabricate crimes [and attribute them] to the organization which is defending the mother earth. Together with Alejandro Moreno Gómez the ejidal Commissioner and the Security Adviser Samuel Díaz Guzmán, they set up a roadblock on the road from Ocosingo to Palenque at the high point at the turning to agua azul in order to blame our organization for blocking the road, and also these lackeys of the bad government are cutting down trees and we know that they are fabricating crimes of ecocide so they can arrest the autonomous authorities of our organization.

We disclaim [any link to] these actions organized and supported by the bad government, together with the ejidal commissioner, they are only looking for a way to bend the law so they can put us in prison and dispossess us of our territory for transnational projects which only benefit those from above. After the violent eviction of January 9, 2015, we in our organization established the San Sebastián regional headquarters to continue caring for the land and to demand the withdrawal of bad government, this is where we will continue because we are the original peoples of these lands and we will not allow the bad government to come to command the people.

We remember today with dignified rage that it is a year since the killing of our compañero Juan Carlos Gómez Silvano, coordinator of the organization in the community of Virgen de Dolores, and next month will mark two years since the killing of our compañero Juan Vázquez Guzmán, secretary general of our organization, in whose memory the struggle in San Sebastián Bachajón continues.

We demand the withdrawal of public forces and of the national commission for protected natural areas from our lands, dispossessed since February 2011.

We demand freedom for our political prisoners Juan Antonio Gómez Silvano, Mario Aguilar Silvano and Roberto Gómez Hernández and of the unjustly imprisoned compañeros Santiago Moreno Perez, Emilio Jimenez Gomez and Esteban Gomez Jimenez.

From the northern zone of the state of Chiapas, the women and men of San Sebastián Bachajón send our combative greetings.

Never again a Mexico without us

Attentively

Land and Freedom! Zapata Vive!

Hasta la victoria siempre!

Freedom for political prisoners!

Juan Vázquez Guzmán Lives, the Bachajón struggle continues!

Juan Carlos Gómez Silvano Lives, the Bachajón struggle continues!

No to the dispossession of indigenous territories!

Immediate presentation of the disappeared compañeros from Ayotzinapa!

JUSTICE FOR AYOTZINAPA, ACTEAL, ABC, ATENCO!

.

.


Chiapas: Believing People of Simojovel announce pilgrimage to Tuxtla to demand peace and justice

Filed under: Frayba, Indigenous — Tags: , — dorsetchiapassolidarity @ 5:08 pm

Chiapas: Believing People of Simojovel announce pilgrimage to Tuxtla to demand peace and justice

by SIPAZ

 dscf4309

The Believing People of Simojovel, during a press-conference held on 17 March at the Fray Bartolomé de las Casas Centre for Human Rights, (CDHFBC), called for a pilgrimage or way of the cross from 23 to 26 March as a means of peacefully denouncing the violence they experience in their region.  They compare this situation of violence at the state and national levels: “Simojovel is a small reflection of what is happening throughout the country: the institutionalized corruption governs at all levels, and for that reason the people must rise up and organize themselves to defend life.  What is at risk is human life, the future of our children, and of our daughters.”  The pilgrimage will be held from 23-26 March, leaving the first day from Simojovel and passing through the communities of Bochil, Ixtapa and Chiapa de Corzo, arriving on Thursday 26 March in the Chiapas capital of Tuxtla Gutiérrez.

.


March 21, 2015

EZLN: About the Homage and the Seminar

Filed under: Uncategorized — dorsetchiapassolidarity @ 8:58 pm

EZLN: About the Homage and the Seminar

.

33. la realidad

Sup Galeano.

ZAPATISTA ARMY FOR NATIONAL LIBERATION.

March 2015.

To the compas of the Sixth in Mexico and in the World:

Compas:

I have been asked to let you know that…

Despite the significant increase in military activity in the vicinity of the Zapatista Caracoles (aggressive patrols, intimidating checkpoints, threatening flyovers)—particularly in the caracoles of La Realidad and Oventik (the first has just opened a school-clinic, and the second will host the tribute to Don Luis Villoro Toranzo)…

Despite the growing belligerence of the paramilitary groups sponsored by the Chiapas government…

Despite the tired “new” lies in the paid media /no, there is not and there has not been any proposal for dialogue; no, not since 2001, that is to say that no federal official has approached the EZLN in the last 14 years for any reason other than in an attempt to assasinate the Zapatista leadership; no, the federal and state governments are not looking to improve the living conditions of indigenous people in Chiapas, rather, they are trying to divide communities; no, the only governmental approaches that Jaime Martinez Veloz claim for himself were not to Zapatistas but to the paramilitaries backed (before he took over) by Luis H. Alvarez, Juan Sabines Guerrero, Felipe Calderon Hinojosa, and now Manuel Velasco Coello, Rosario Robles Berlanga and Enrique Peña Nieto, one of whose groups (the CIOAC-H) is responsible for the murder of the compañero teacher Galeano; no, and so forth and so on/…

Despite the fact that truth and justice are still missing in Ayotzinapa…

Despite the fact that out there they’re busy with other things (more important things, right?) and that quickly changing trends in “mobilization” only prove that frivolousness is the overall strategy…

In spite of the fact that dignity reveals, time and again, reality / in the far north of Mexico it is discovered that there are still methods of exploitation from the time of President Porfirio Diaz. “In the North we work and have to support the lazy ones in South,” say the powerful; and while the fields are cultivated by men, women, children and elderly indigenous Triqui and Maya, the powerful say nothing and kneel before foreign power. In the Valle de San Quintin, Baja California, in what is known as Oaxacalifornia, the day laborers ask for fair wages and labor rights. They boil it down to few words: “we only want justice.” The government represses them “for going around like rowdy troublemakers”: 200 are detained. The governor, a PANista, meets with the commanders of the 67 infantry battalion of the federal army “to maintain social peace.” The top headline in the paid media is “007 in the Zócalo”. The hashtag #SanQuintinEnLucha isn’t trending /

In spite of it all…

Or precisely because of it all…

the EZLN confirms the celebration of:

– The homage to the compañero Luis Villoro Toranzo and Zapatista teacher Galeano, on May 2, 2015, in theCaracol of Oventic, Chiapas, Mexico. In this homage, in addition to the Zapatista compañeras and compañerosbases of support, the following people have confirmed their participation: Juan Villoro Ruiz, Fernanda Navarro, Adolfo Gilly, Pablo Gonzalez Casanova, Don Mario Gonzalez Contreras, father of César Manuel Gonzalez Hernandez, one of the 46 missing from Ayotzinapa, and Doña Bertha Nava, mother of Julio Cesar Ramirez Nava, one of the 46 missing from Ayotzinapa; as well as family members of compañero teacher Galeano and Zapatista autonomous authorities of the 5 zones.

– The kick-off of the seminar “Critical Thought Versus the Capitalist Hydra,” convoked by CIDECI-Unitierra and the EZLN’s Sixth Commission on May 3-9, 2015, in the mountains of the Mexican southeast. I have been told that the following people have confirmed their participation in the Seminar:

Doña Bertha Nava, Don Mario González Contreras and Doña Hilda Hernández Rivera, (family members of Ayotzinapa’s missing 46). Pablo González Casanova. Adolfo Gilly. Juan Villoro Ruiz. Elena Álvarez-Buylla. Catherine Marielle. Álvaro Salgado. Alicia Castellanos. Óscar Olivera (Bolivia). Margarita Millán. Sylvia Marcos. Mariana Favela. Karla Quiñonez (USA). Xuno López. Jean Robert. Carlos González. María Eugenia Sánchez Díaz de Rivera. Eduardo Almeida Acosta. Vilma Almendra (Colombia). Philippe Corcuff (France). Luis Lozano Arredondo. Juan Wahrem (Argentina). Rosa Albina Garabito. Jerónimo Díaz. Rubén Trejo. Manuel Rosenthal (Colombia). Hugo Blanco (Perú). Juan Carlos Mijangos Noh. Greg Ruggeiro (USA). Ana Lydia Flores Marín. Javier Hernández Alpízar. Pablo Reyna. Christine Pellicane (France). Efraín Herrera. Domi. Antonio Ramírez. John Berger (Great Britain). Donovan Hernández. Sergio Rodríguez. Raúl Zibechi (Uruguay). Sergio Tischler Visquerra (Guatemala). Jorge Alonso. Jerome Baschet (France). Paulina Fernández C. Carlos Aguirre Rojas. Gilberto López y Rivas. Daniel Inclán. Enzo Traverso (Italy). Silvia Federici (Italy). Immanuel Wallerstein (USA). John Holloway (Ireland). Michael Lowy (Brazil-France). Marcos Roitman (Chile-Spanish State).

From the concierge of the Little School, stacking boxes and more boxes marked “FLUNKEES.”

Mexico, March 2015.

10985452_860968603944833_2841848333489526008_n

Section entitled “From the Diaries of the Cat-Dog”

On options:

Imagine you are having a nightmare. You find yourself in the midst of a desolated landscape. Not like after a war, but rather as if in the midst of its horror. On the right side of the road dividing the landscape is a modern building complex. At the entrance, a sign gives notice or warning: “Visions of Reality Mall.” Two modern imposing buildings stand out. The marquee for one of them reads, “Course in Ethical Jounralism and Objetive Reporting. Taught by: Ciro Gómez Leyva, Ricardo Alemán, Joaquín López Dóriga, Javier Alatorre and Laura Bozzo.” The building by its side announces: “Course in Ethical Journalism and Objetive Reporting. Taught by: Jacobo Zabludovski and 4 others from the only remaining free and independent spaces.”

You, a discerning person, of course, tolerant, of course, inclusive, of course, civilized, of course, reasonable, of course, with reasoned arguments, of course, educated, of course, with an actual e-d-u-c-a-t-i-o-n, of course. Even in your nightmares you maintain your composure, obviously.

That’s why you understand why there are long lines to get into one place or the other.

You are feeling self-congratulatory due to the fact that there are informational options for every preference when you hear, in a corner to the left, a little girl trying to play the tune of “the long and winding road” by the Beatles on her school flute.

You, unable to hide your irritation at the child’s off-key notes, realize that on the left side of this long and torturous road there is a group of beings (incomprehensible, of course), constructing little huts (miserable little things, of course), and their signs do not offer courses or discounts, of course, but rather manage only to stammer “free, autonomous, alternative, or whatever you call them media.”

You are faced then with a dilemma: either you—generously of course—widen your criteria, your tolerance, your inclusiveness, your civility toward this side of the road; or you feel grateful that there are things that never go out of style (like the bulldozer, the nightstick, the police, the antiriot squads). You are paralyzed in the face of this complex dilemma. Since you don’t know what to do, your smartphone—thanks to a modern application that gives you a zap whenever the hard drive is reconfigured (yours, of course)—activates in order to awaken you. You come to attention, but everything looks the same: the war landscape, the fancy buildings on the right side, the poor ones on the left. Ah, but instead of the out-of-tune flute playing “the long and winding road” you hear a disconcerting rhythm, a mix of ballad-cumbia-corrido-ranchera-tropical-hiphop-ska-heavy-metal that, played on the marimba, launches into “Ya se mira el horizonte…” [the Zapatista anthem].

In that terrible situation you know that you have to take drastic measures. But you can’t decide, should I get a new cell phone, or just update the operating system? That, my friend, is a real dilemma. But vote or not vote, what is that??

11069397_860968557278171_5890735685898017666_n

On the paid media:

– They say that those wise men and women, of grand studies and knowledge, realized that what the ignorant, illiterate, and premodern indigenous said was true: “in capitalism, the one who pays rules.”

– On the “five free and independent spaces” and Molotov: uh oh, it seems that Jacobo did make someone stupid.[1]

On postmodernity:

– Note to divers: the pool doesn’t have water, just shit. Proceed with caut…. Splash!

– Break-up conversation of a postmodern couple: It’s not you, it’s the context.”

On the seminar:

– The following message came from Italy: “So-and-so said he would only attend (the seminar) if he could personally talk to subcomandante insurgente marcos.” When the deceased heard that, thinking the message was from Monica Bellucci, he began to stir in his grave. Later they told him who the message was from and, disappointed, the deceased settled back down. SupMoy said to just send a message back that “il supmarcos e morto, se volete, potete cercare in inferno” [italian in original] along with a calendar. Questioned on the subject by Los Tercios Compas S.A. (without) C. (nor) V. of (i)R. (i) L.[2] (note: use of this brand prohibited without the express written consent of those who (can’t) pay for it), SupMoy declared “the thing is that there are people who don’t realize that we are in 2015.

– Pst. Pst. The organization of the seminar is a mess. But pretend you didn’t hear that. Place yourself in harmony with the universe. Now repeat with me “ommmm, the seminar is already organized, ommmm.”

I testify: meow-woof (and vice versa).

[1]“Que no te haga bobo Jacobo” (Don’t Let Jacobo make you stupid) is a song by Molotov referring to media giant Televisa’s ex-anchor Jacobo Zabludovsky.

[2] S.A. de C.V. de R.L. in Spanish stands for Sociedad Anonima de Capital Variable de Responsibilidad Limitada, or Anonymous Society of Variable Capital, Limited Liability. The formulation here, S.A. (sin)C (ni) V de (i)R (i)L, would mean Anonymous Society (without) Capital (nor) variable capital of (un)limited (ir)responsibility.

.


600 members of the public forces burn down the regional headquarters of San Sebastian Bachajón

Filed under: Bachajon, Displacement, Human rights, Indigenous, Repression — Tags: , — dorsetchiapassolidarity @ 5:50 pm

.

600 members of the public forces burn down the regional headquarters of San Sebastian Bachajón

.

bachajon6

.

“Compañeros and compañeras, we denounce that today March 21, 2015 at 8 o’clock in the morning more than 600 members of the public forces burned our regional headquarters known as San Sebastián, with the participation of the ejidal Commissioner Alejandro Moreno Gómez and the Security Adviser Samuel Díaz Guzmán. Once again the politics of death and the corruption of the bad government are demonstrated, and its contempt for the people and human rights because it seeks to achieve its ambition to get hold of our territory through the dispossession of the land, the water and everything that exists in our country, in order to gain money, as if it were merchandise.

We hold the paramilitary chiefs peña nieto and manuel velasco responsible for the violence in San Sebastián Bachajón and for the human rights violations, death and repression of women and men in our organization who do not sell their dignity in exchange for their crumbs.”

Adherents to the Sixth, ejido San Sebastián Bachajón

.


Bachajón reports new threat of dispossession

Filed under: Bachajon, Displacement, Indigenous, La Sexta — Tags: , — dorsetchiapassolidarity @ 3:19 pm

.

Bachajón reports new threat of dispossession

,

bachajon16

.

March 20, 2015

The compañeros of the ejido San Sebastian Bachajón, adherents to the Sixth Declaration of the Lacandon Jungle, report that the roadblock conducted by political party supporters at the turning to the waterfalls of Agua Azul, which started on 17th March, is continuing; now it is the people of Commissioner Alejandro Moreno Gómez (ejidal Commissioner) and Samuel Díaz Guzmán (vigilance councillor) who are in charge of this.

The ejidatarios informed us by telephone that the Commissioner is organizing his people to evict the compañeros from San José en Rebeldia and from the  “San Sebastian” Regional  Headquarters, land recuperated by the compañeros of San Sebastián Bachajón.

The compañeros will not give up the struggle for the defence of their land and territory and for the release of their prisoners.

We ask that you remain aware of the situation of the compañeros.

.

http://kolectivozero.blogspot.co.uk/2015/03/denuncia-bachajon-nueva-amenaza-de.html

.


Ejido Bachajón alerts to possible attempt at displacement.

Filed under: Uncategorized — dorsetchiapassolidarity @ 3:13 pm

.

Ejido Bachajón alerts to possible attempt at displacement.

.

bachajon18

Chilón, Chiapas, March 20. Tzeltal indigenous from the ejido San Sebastian Bachajón, adherents to the Sixth Declaration, again disclaim any links with the roadblock at the turning to the Agua Azul waterfalls on the Ocosingo-Palenque highway. They state that it is the people of the ruling ejidal Commissioner Alejandro Moreno Gómez, and Samuel Díaz Guzmán (vigilance councillor) who are in charge of the blockade.

The ejidatarios reported that Moreno Gómez is organizing his people to evict the ejidatarios from San José en Rebeldia and from the “San Sebastian” Regional Headquarters, land recuperated by the indigenous of Bachajón.

Adherents to the Sixth make it clear that they will not give up the struggle to defend their land and territory and for the release of their prisoners, and ask people to remain aware of the situation of their members, via Kolektivo Zero.

In the same way, commercial dailies report that “at any time, an armed confrontation is expected between opposing groups that are in dispute over the area,” which could lead, as on previous occasions, to government repression. e.g. From Quinto Poder: “Armed group hinders tourism transport and is on the point of a confrontation. Tourism businesses on the Ruta Maya report that at this time, near the Agua Azul Waterfalls, heavily armed people, allegedly Zapatistas, have blocked the road with the aim of recovering 100% of the territory, so they are delaying any vehicle which drives through the area. The conflict, which has lasted for years and has intensified in recent months, is known of by the Government Secretary, Eduardo Ramirez, who has done nothing about it and who has answered repeatedly that he has instructions from the Governor Manuel Velasco Coello not to intervene in the indigenous areas. An armed confrontation is expected at any moment between opposing groups who are disputing the area, which is one of the attractions of our state to national and international tourism.”https://www.facebook.com/mxQuintopoder/photos/a.659347497429276.1073741841.657066724324020/921659737864716/?type=1&theater

http://www.pozol.org/?p=10418

.


What keeps this Mexican journalist going?

Filed under: Uncategorized — dorsetchiapassolidarity @ 3:09 pm

What keeps this Mexican journalist going?

A reporter covering the horrors of the Mexican drug wars on the anger that fuels his work.

Luis Hernandez Navarro has exhaustively reported the horrific events in the small city of Iguala, Mexico, in the turbulent state of Guerrero.

Luis Hernandez Navarro has exhaustively reported the horrific events in the small city of Iguala, Mexico, in the turbulent state of Guerrero.

By: Rick Salutin Columnist, Published on Fri Mar 20 2015

Luis Hernandez Navarro was in Toronto this week to speak about the crisis in Mexico after the deaths and kidnappings of student teachers last fall. He’s an eminent journalist and opinion editor at La Jornada, Mexico’s second largest daily. It’s well to the left of leftish papers elsewhere like the Star or Guardian.

He’s exhaustively reported those events in the small city of Iguala in the turbulent state of Guerrero. The students were from one of Mexico’s fabled rural teachers’ colleges, which have been crucial to social progress since the revolution 100 years ago. They were exploring ways to travel to Mexico City to mark the anniversary of a 1968 massacre of student protesters. That included “fishing” for busses which they would “borrow,” and then return. It’s a bit loosey-goosey but so has social order been during the “drug wars” of the last decade. Probably over 120,000 killed; 23,000-30,000 missing. People tolerate informal arrangements. But six of the students were killed in encounters with police and military; 43 disappeared, or were kidnapped. It wasn’t the first or last time but for some reason it resonated nationally and sparked outrage.

It’s routinely mysterious what ignites social explosions, though you can always speculate afterward. In Tunisia in 2010, a street vendor, humiliated by police, set himself afire and the Arab Spring immediately followed. He wasn’t the first or last either. It’s one reason I drifted from my early Marxist leanings: you just can’t “analyze” history well enough to anticipate or manipulate it.

Luis says (in retrospect) that the Iguala events were “the last straw.” Mexico has been deteriorating from a “narco-state” — strong central government colluding with crime cartels — to a “mafia state” — numerous political and criminal elements battling each other chaotically. What resonated from Iguala wasn’t the brutal deaths (face of one student ripped off his skull) but the missing. You can’t stop hoping they’re still alive, though it’s hopeless. And the authorities do nothing, or less: they cover it up, generating more rage. Half of Guerrero’s municipalities have now been seized and governed by local, unofficial groups.

There’s also the resonance of the rural teachers’ colleges. They were part of the two key elements in the original revolution: free universal education and land reform. They brought literacy and hygiene to peasants and still do — though they’ve been under attack since the ’68 protest. They have a legendary status.

And there’s this: in Mexico the revolution never dies away. In the U.S. their revolution is a faded memory, preserved mainly by laughable “re-enactors.” In Canada our relation to our past is so tenuous we must be constantly reminded to recall it. (Remember the War of 1812? Remember last year’s commemoration of it?) In Mexico, history — especially the revolution — always seems right there.

Luis says the momentum from last fall appears to have stalled. The struggle is now between memory and forgetting of that particular event, though others will surely take their place. I asked what keeps him going. He sighed and said, “Right now I am feeling great anger.” He used the word indignation, an interesting term that has recurred in social justice movements lately. I think its appeal is that it contains the term for dignity. Tunisians called their movement the dignity revolution though media tried to label it the “jasmine revolution.”

But he said youth give him hope. In Mexico City, dentistry students asked him to speak about Iguala, to describe “what wasn’t on TV.” They thanked him for telling them what they already felt but didn’t fully know. It’s surprising where you can find hope for a nobler future: dentists. Take note, Dalhousie.

Then he asked why this interested me. Without a ready answer, I said too glibly, because nothing human is alien to me. Aha, he replied, “Carlos Marx said that too. You’re not as far from him as you think.” It’s true, there was a 19th-century version of the lightning round and Marx gave that line, in the original Latin, as his favourite saying. And glibness aside, I believe it. You don’t have to be an expert or linguist to find things that are common and even inspiring in distant settings. Besides, we’re cellmates, us and the Mexicans, in NAFTA.

http://www.thestar.com/opinion/commentary/2015/03/20/what-keeps-this-mexican-journalist-going-salutin.html


 

March 20, 2015

Boca en Boca no.30, March 2015

Filed under: Boca en Boca — Tags: — dorsetchiapassolidarity @ 7:58 pm

 

Boca en Boca no.30, March 2015

beb30inglogo

Power to the people can only be put into practice when the power exercised by social elites is dissolved into the people”.

Murray Bookchin (US Anarchist)

As stated by Bookchin, the inspiration of the Kurdistan struggle, power to the people must come from the people themselves. What we all know and understand [about power] is that it is not by asking for it, demanding it or claiming it from the government or the social elites, that we will get it but instead we must take it ourselves. In order to do so, there are various ways, among them those taken up through resistance and civil disobedience by various struggles and initiatives, such as the Civil Society Las Abejas, the Popular Constituent Citizen [Assembly], the Zapatista movement and others.

Due to the diverse forms of repression, deepening and often reaching collectives and individuals on a daily basis, various groups of people reassert and strengthen their convictions in their struggle for freedom, justice and dignity.

Download It!

So we hear from the Pueblo Creyente of Simojovel [PCS], when they mobilize with dignity against corruption and monopoly; also we hear from the inhabitants of Pantelhó protesting against mining that only brings death for the benefit of the elites; or from the Women of Acteal, and from elsewhere, when they organize themselves against exclusion and dispossession; or from Candelaria el Alto fighting for respect for the way they organize to defend their lands. The People of Tuxtla Gutiérrez, when they get angry about the mismanagement and corruption in their institutions, angry at seeing the not so natural environmental disasters happening in their lands. The people of Bachajón, exercising justice by guarding their natural resources for their free will and enjoyment; the migrants tired of fleeing and hiding from the inhumane treatment which they suffer during their journey through Mexico.

The reconstruction of the country, like that of the world, must begin with respect between everyone who lives there or even just passes by, and the responsibilities involved in living together, ensuring the application of justice, freedom and dignity.

We remind you that via the PDF version of this document you can find the links to the full articles which provide more information on the stories in this bulletin. If you need this bulletin in another language, or if you can translate it into another language, please email us! We invite you to follow us on our Facebook page, “Kolectivo Boka En Boka”.

Greetings and resistances

Kolectivo Boka en Boka

bocaenboca@riseup.net

Download It!

beb30ingp1

beb30ingp2

.

**********************************************************

.

March 18, 2015

17 displaced Tojolabal families fear further violence against them

Filed under: Displacement, Frayba, Human rights, Indigenous — Tags: , — dorsetchiapassolidarity @ 9:14 pm

 

17 displaced Tojolabal families fear further violence against them.

primero-de-agosto-B-N-526x330

On 15 March 2015, in the camp of families who were displaced more than 20 days ago from the community of Primero de Agosto in the municipality of Las Margaritas, 550 people came from neighbouring communities to show solidarity and support through a religious ceremony, due to the fear of having one more misfortune in this jungle border area.

The vast majority of the people who arrived came from 13 different communities in the region, along with representatives of CDH Frayba and internationals in solidarity. Despite the insistent leafletting telling them not to support the 17 displaced families, and harassment by members of the CIOAC-H, the neighbouring communities came, massively choosing peace and brotherhood.

The residents of Primero de Agosto tell how, this same morning, before those in solidarity arrived, some ejidatarios from Miguel Hidalgo, where the aggressors come from, walked in front of the camp communicating with radios. They also reported that during the week, while walking next to the camp, the ejidatarios laughed, joked and commented that they would throw them out one more time. It was reported that even in Las Margaritas they came to insist that those in solidarity did not bring aid to the “young” because they did not need it.

The 57 displaced souls live in very poor conditions and now have no home. They have only canvas tents without floors. They have no easy access to water, and as campesinos, they lack land to work. Nevertheless, they survive with the support they receive in solidarity. As a result of these inhuman conditions, they are suffering from illnesses, both the children and the women, of whom one is pregnant. From all this, they conclude that the members of CIOAC-H are looking to do away with them and complain that the government does not seek to resolve their situation, following a roundtable dialogue that lasted awhile.

SAM_1220

The local population is aware of the suffering endured by these families, their condition and their pacifism, which persists against the attacks and harassment perpetrated by the ejidatarios of Miguel Hidalgo, so there can be no doubt of the need to support them. It is thought that they need land to found a family; it is legitimate that they have lived there and their dispossession is not valid.

They still remain firm in their positions, they are not going anywhere, unless it is back to the village which gave them life and of which they are the guardians. It is of great importance to them to that justice is done and that there is mutual respect among all.

The displaced indigenous Tojolabales are calling for public opinion to be aware of their problems and they call for a more global solidarity to demand that the government does not wait for one more eviction or to see… one more massacre.

http://www.pozol.org/?p=10395

 

.

***********************************************************

.

San Sebastián Bachajon disclaims any links with the roadblock on March 17 and denounces attacks

Filed under: Bachajon, Displacement, Indigenous, La Sexta — Tags: , — dorsetchiapassolidarity @ 8:48 pm

 

San Sebastián Bachajon disclaims any links with the roadblock on March 17 and denounces attacks

caseta-cobro1

San Cristobal de las Casas, March 17, 2015

Ejidatarios of San Sebastián Bachajón, adherents to the Sixth Declaration of the Lacandon Jungle, inform us that today, March 17, political party supporters from the community of Suquil Ulub carried out a roadblock at the turning to the waterfalls of Agua Azul, the compañeros adherents denied having any part in this.

They denounced that in recent days they have been attacked by the party supporters. Today in the morning, two compañeros ejidatarios who were carrying out their guard duties were beaten.

They hold Alejandro Moreno Gomez, Samuel Diaz Guzman and the three levels of government responsible for the attacks and for what may happen.

San Sebastian Bachajón continues to demand the release of their prisoners and continues in resistance in defence of its ancestral territory.

The compañeros asked people to be attentive to the situation in the Ejido San Sebastián Bachajón.

 

http://kolectivozero.blogspot.co.uk/2015/03/san-sebastian-bachajon-se-deslinda-de.html

.

*****************************************************

.

Women up in Arms: Zapatistas and Rojava Kurds Embrace a New Gender Politics

Filed under: Women, Zapatista — Tags: , , — dorsetchiapassolidarity @ 8:07 pm

 

Women up in Arms: Zapatistas and Rojava Kurds Embrace a New Gender Politics

 

dsc04448

Written by Charlotte Maria Sáenz

Resistance and strength manifest like weeds through cracks in Chiapas, Mexico and transnational Kurdistan where the respective Zapatista and Kurdish resistance movements are creating new gender relations as a primary part of their struggle and process for building a better world. In both places, women’s participation in the armed forces has been an entry-point for a new social construction of gender relations based on equity.

While the Kurds have been fighting for their survival against ISIS in the Syrian/Turkish border town of Kobane, the Zapatistas put down their arms over 20 years ago and have maintained a non-violent struggle since. In both cases, women have fought alongside men against their own collective obliteration while making radical changes in their gender relations. Working towards more equity makes possible more direct democracy in building greater autonomy from the state.[1] In both efforts, there is also a deep connection to the land[2] that regards the value of women and the environment as essential to life itself.

In both resistances, women took up arms to fight alongside their male counterparts, showing both willingness and capacity to fight as soldiers. However, their principal objective in the mountains is not military. Rather, their most important task is to form new persons: men and women in a more equitable relationship to each other–a relationship that is also anti-capitalist. “Above everything, we want for our militancy to create a new personality, one that is in complete contradiction to Capitalism,” says a representative of the Kurdish Committee of Jineology (a committee of and for women founded by the transnational PKK (Partiya Karkerên Kurdistanê), the Kurdish Workers Party.[3] Theirs is a commitment to building democracy, socialism, ecology and feminism.

The Zapatistas made a similar commitment to more equitable gender relations. One of the first things to come out of their armed uprising in 1994 was the Revolutionary Law of Women. This law spelled out 10 new rules giving women unprecedented power over their lives, including choosing whether and whom to marry, the right to serve on governing councils, and the right to bear arms as milicianas, militia fighters, in the Zapatista Army of National Liberation (EZLN in Spanish).  Zapatista women also asked for the law to include a prohibition of drugs and alcohol, in order to address one of the main causes of domestic violence. After the ceasefire only twelve days after the uprising, many women soldiers transitioned to a non-military political life taking unprecedented positions of governance, education, administration, and decision-making—another ways of taking up in arms, this time with each other and with men. For the last 21 years, both men and women have been in a process of unlearning old gender norms, relearning how to be and relate to each other anew, sharing both domestic and public duties. Although the construction of gender equity is still in progress, these new relations between men and women have been a fundamental component of the construction of Zapatista autonomy itself.

These radical changes in gender relations are occurring in contexts of tremendous violence and war of both high and low intensity. In Kobane, near the Turkish border, Kurds have been upholding a heroic resistance to the ravages of ISIS on the one hand, and the racist and repressive manipulations of the Turkish State on the other. In Chiapas, the Zapatistas have been building their autonomy within the increasing violence of a narco-state that dominates much of the nation, where it is hard to discern the difference between government and drug traffickers. In nearby Guerrero–a southwestern state in Mexico also known for its rich natural resources, intense drug trafficking, resistance movements and community policing–women have also joined the armed ranks of the policia comunitaria. These armed patrols have risen to fill the vacuum left by corrupt police on the narco-payroll, and are on the rise in various other communities across the country. Men and women are fighting together on these different frontlines, sometimes crossing state and national borders to join in combat, like the many young anarchist women from Turkey who crossed in busses into Syria to help the Kurds in Kobane resist ISIS in the past months.

rojavawomeninarmserin_trieb

Certain parts of the 30 year-old Kurdish resistance have also taken on the project of forging more equal relations between men and women as a crucial part of their political project. With Kurds spread across Turkey, Syria and Iraq, the geopolitical concept of Kurdistan has been expanded trans-nationally into what some are describing as a “Democratic Confederalism” that transcends nation-state borders. This is an aspiration as of yet, not a fully developed reality, nor one embraced by all Kurds. These ideas are mainly derived from the evolving writings of the leader of the Kurdish Workers Party, (PKK) Abdullah Öcalan, who has been imprisoned in Turkey since 1999. His “Democratic Confederalism” aims to build a new system that works towards the just distribution of resources as well as the conservation of the environment. It seeks to create a society free of sexism, replacing traditional patriarchal societies, religious interpretations, and capitalist merchandising of women. The movement has undertaken an intense societal and educational labor to combat the patriarchal mentalities implanted in women, as a form of submission, and in men, in form of domination.[4]

Zapatista and Kurdish resistances have taken on a radical paradigm shift that changes everything. In the Zapatista autonomous municipal administration centre called “Caracol de Oventic”, there is an “Office for Women’s Dignity” where women gather to discuss the successes and failures of the Revolutionary Law of Women. Similarly, the PKK’s “Jineology Committee” studies women’s histories to understand the construction of hierarchies and nation-states that erode women’s power in society. Both communities come from intense patriarchal histories and contexts, so there is still a long way to go in both movements. Yet in a short time they have made extraordinary gains. Women are increasingly represented on governing councils and active in their armed ranks, but the real revolution is seen within the domestic sphere, where caring for children, health and home are shared labour between men and women. Both Kurds and Zapatistas offer a living example of what is not only possible, but of what is already being practiced and grown.[5]

Working towards what the Zapatistas would call an “Other” way of relating to each other, men and women traverse spaces of war as well as of pastoral, agricultural and domestic care–learning with and from each other whether in the battlefields or making food. It is in these everyday practices of building autonomy that we begin to unearth the possibility of another kind of life, of another way of knowing, being with and relating to each other that can create and nourish better ways of living. It starts with making patriarchal habits visible. Constructing more equitable relations means a daily practice of better, kinder ways of relating between men and women. This is the learning for all of us to put into practice within our own places and with our own people, not only up in arms, but also arm in arm…abrazándonos, embracing each other.

Notes:

[1] For example, Mesoamerican asambleas or the first Sumerians and the decentralized organizations of clan and tribal configurations  as described in “El confederalismo democrático: propuesta libertaria del pueblo kurdo.” ALB Noticias en Mar, 17 septiembre 2013.

[2] “Land and Liberty” has been the rallying cry of the Zapatistas, both then and now, while “Land or Death” the slogan heard in the Botan district today as reported by Heysam Mislim in “Kobane Diary: 4 Days Inside the City Fighting an Unprecedented Resistance Against ISIS,” Newsweek, October 15, 2014.

[3] Committee of Jineology as quoted by Jorge Ricardo Ottino, writing for Resumen Latinoamericano from mountains of Xinêre, areas of media defense, South Kurdistan, Republic of Iraq, 3rd July 2014.

[4] “El confederalismo democrático: propuesta libertaria del pueblo kurdo.” ALB Noticias en Mar, 17 septiembre 2013.

[5] For a more in-depth description of the Kurdish Women’s movement see https://www.opendemocracy.net/arab-awakening/necla-acik/kobane-struggle-….

 

Charlotte Maria Sáenz is Media and Education Coordinator for Other Worlds and teaches at the California Institute for Integral Studies in San Francisco, where she is a founding member of the Centre for Art and Social Justice. She has 20 years’ experience working globally in schools, streets, universities, refugee camps, autonomous zones and traveling programs in her native Mexico, throughout Lebanon, and the United States. She returns yearly to work with Universidad de la Tierra Chiapas, Al-Jana in Beirut, and taught on World Learning’s global traveling program “Beyond Globalization.” She is a member of the global Learning Societies and the International Organization for a Participatory Society.

 

http://upsidedownworld.org/main/international-archives-60/5250-women-up-in-arms-zapatistas-and-rojava-kurds-embrace-a-new-gender-politics

.

****************************************************

.

Older Posts »

The Shocking Blue Green Theme. Create a free website or blog at WordPress.com.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 414 other followers